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Sat 2 Sep #1 
Ruby Franks
Contributor


I did say that I'd make some suggestions and will do, I've had a look at some and can see some of the problems. I will continue and I hope you'll forgive me if I have a somewhat scattergun approach. To start with is there a problem with including Dances (S&L)?




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Sat 2 Sep #2 
Ruby Franks
Contributor

I started several weeks ago by asking why celebrity perfumes was a brainoff subject and cookery terms (Misc) was not, because I thought cookery terms seemed a more acceptable trivia subject. The answer was that a lot of the answers were very long to be included for brainoffs, which is true, but I think that most can be edited down. What's put me off doing this is the time to do the whole list at once, so forgive me if I do a few at a time, without expecting the rapid response unit each time I post.

 

Aerate -- A synonym for sift -- To pass ingredients through a fine-meshed device such as a sieve, to break up large pieces and to incorporate air into the ingredients to make them lighter.

Al dente -- Pasta cooked so as to retain a firm texture -- 'To the tooth' in Italian. Can also be used for vegetables.

Bake -- To cook in the oven -- Usually the term applies to flour based foods, bread, cakes and pastries, but can be used about fish and meats. Food is cooked  at a moderate heat causing moisture within to evaporate slowly, concentrating the flavour.

 

For the moment I'm stopping here, so that when you have time you can tell me if I'm on the right lines. I think a lot of the answers in this subject have parts which can be turned into the information afterwards.




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Sun 3 Sep #3 
JMK
Editor

Dances used to be a random but the problem is that too many of the answers could aplly to more than one question. With a little work it could work.

You are on the right track with Cookery Terms. Any terms that are too tricky we can just delete.

 




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Sun 3 Sep #4 
Ruby Franks
Contributor

I had been wondering whether with some of these possible subjects, that if answers were too long/similar if the subject could be divided into two. Some of our subjects which have a lot of answers are already divided, so maybe Dances which has over 100 facts could be divided so that the similar ones don't clash?




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Mon 4 Sep #5 
JMK
Editor

Yes, that is an option, could break into part 1 and 2 or preferably into categories of dance.




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Tue 5 Sep #6 
Ruby Franks
Contributor

More cookery terms:

Beat -- To smooth a mixture by whipping or stirring -- With a spoon, fork, whisk, rotary beater or electric mixer.

Blanch -- To plunge fruit or vegetables briefly into boiling water -- The ingredients can then be placed into ice or cold water (refreshed) in order to stop the cooking process and so prepare the ingredients for freezing or peeling.

Blend -- To mix or fold ingredients together to create an equal distribution.

Braise -- Browning meat in oil or other fat, then cooking slowly in liquid. -- Braising tenderises the meat.

Coddle -- To cook gently at a temperature below boiling point -- Usually eggs.

Direct Heat -- Heat reaching food without barriers -- e.g. Broiling, grilling or toasting.  If food is wrapped or covered it is not getting direct heat. 

Dredge -- To sprinkle lightly with sugar or flour -- Dredgers are containers with holes in the lid or spoons with holes in the bowl, to produce an even sprinkle. Not quite a synonym for 'dust', dredge usually refers to the top of a food being sprinkled.

Drizzle -- A slow thin trickle of liquid over food -- Sweet glazes, melted butter. Lemon drizzle cake!

Dust -- To give  food a light coating of powdery ingredients -- e.g. sugar, spices, or flour either before or after cooking. Coat meatballs with flour before cooking, coat chocolate truffles with fine grated chocolate and spices as a final touch.

Egg wash -- Beaten egg mixture used to glaze -- Usually for baked goods, egg wash can be the whole egg or the yolk, either neat or mixed with milk, water or butter.




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Tue 5 Sep #7 
Ruby Franks
Contributor

Slowly, slowly . Some notes:

Beat - I didn't like the word 'smoothen'.

Blanch - I've never used ice water, nor was taught to, but on googling I see most sources include the ice water. Need an editorial decision.

Coddle - definition at the moment is more of a dish than a cookery term and is included Cuisines of the World.

Entree - I think this should be deleted as it's not really a cookery term, appears elsewhere, and none of the other names for courses appears in the subject.




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Tue 5 Sep #8 
JMK
Editor

Smoothen is pretty weird, thinking of going with:

stir or whip ingredients vigorously until smooth.

Blanching usually involves dipping into ice water in order to stop further cooking but that part can go in the extra info.

Dust and dredge are so similar I have kept the meaning the same and put the difference in the extra info

Need to look carefully at the meanings of mix, whisk and beat

Changed the questions to:

What is the meaning of the cookery term x?
Which cookery term means y?

Because of that have adjusted the wording a little.

I have removed anything that is equipment like bundt pan, they can have their own subject. Also things which describe a type of food rather than a cooking method eg chiffon and flan.

Thinking of removing Direct heat, it doesn't fit well.




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Tue 5 Sep #9 
Ruby Franks
Contributor

Dredger to go in to cooking equipment?

Direct heat is really 'cooking under direct heat' and you're right about it.




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Tue 5 Sep #10 
JMK
Editor

Dredge is a verb so ok to be there. Removed Direct Heat.




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Tue 5 Sep #11 
Ruby Franks
Contributor

I wan't wanting to remove 'dredge' but suggesting  'dredger' for the equipment topic.




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Tue 5 Sep #12 
Nemesis
Editor

When will it be ready to eat?




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Tue 5 Sep #13 
JMK
Editor

Needs to bake for a few more days.

See what you mean about the dredger. Maybe start a new thread and start adding items and their definitions to it.




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Tue 5 Sep #14 
Ruby Franks
Contributor

Flambe: I don't know how to add an accent. Is it possible to give it the accent? (also saute?)

Gratin: I just don't know this current definition. Is it a difference between US and UK usage? (Yeah, I know it's French) I'm going to proffer what I know and what I've confirmed with wiki.

Hull: difficult, not so much leafy parts as stem? Husk: to me a different thing, taking the outer papery bits from fresh walnuts or husking corn on the cob?

Infuse: doesn't make sense currently.

Leavener: another problem word for me...

Render: I don't think drippings is a word

Scald: I'm proposing to remove one meaning whch is a synonym for blanch.

 

Flambe -- To ignite a sauce or other liquid -- Flames add to the cooking process  e.g. Steak Diane, Christmas Pudding.

Garnish -- The addition of a decorative edible ingredient -- Parsley, basil or mint sprigs, chocolate curls, lemon wedges and many more.

Glaze -- To coat with a liquid that gives a shiny surface -- Egg wash or milk on pastry or water on nearly finished loaves, provide glaze.

Gratin -- A dish topped with a  browned crust -- The crust can consist of  breadcrumbs, cheese, egg, melted butter, singly or in any combination. Other ingredients are available!

Hull -- To remove the calyx of soft fruit

Husk -- To remove the outer membrane of a fruit, nut or seed -- Corn, cobnuts, walnuts.

Infuse -- To extract flavour from an ingredient by steeping in liquid -- The result is an infusion. Tea and coffee are hot infusions, chilli oil a cold infusion.

Knead -- To work dough to a smooth and elastic state.

Larding -- The insertion of pieces of fat to meat -- In order to maintain moisture and improve basting.

Leaven -- A process or ingredient that causes baked goods to rise -- Yeast, bicarbonate of soda.

Peaks -- Result of a stiffly beaten ingredient or mixture -- e.g. peaks of egg white for meringue.

Pipe -- Use a bag to force out a soft ingredient as decoration -- Mashed potato, icing/frosting for a cake.

Pit -- To remove the central pip or seed from a fruit -- Apricots, olives, mangoes.

Refresh -- To plunge cooked vegetables/fruit into ice water -- Or cold water, to halt the cooking process and retain colour and flavour

Render -- To melt meat fat to create dripping.

Saute -- To fry in shallow oil.

Scald -- To heat a liquid to just below boiling point -- e.g. scalded cream or milk

Score -- Make shallow cuts on the surface of meat -- Assists in marinating, creates crackling on roast pork.

Sift -- Remove lumps from a dry ingredient by using a mesh -- e.g. sieving flour or sugar. It also helps to aerate the ingredient.

Skim -- Remove the top layer from a liquid -- e.g. cream from milk, fat from gravy or stock.

Steep -- Infuse dry ingredients in liquid 

Stir-Fry -- Rapid frying with constant stirring in very little oil -- A Chinese technique usually using a wok, to cook finely cut meat, vegetables or fish.

Truss -- Use string or skewers to shape meat and poultry -- Keeps the shape whilst cooking.

Unleavened - Applies to baked goods without rising agents.

Zest -- Finely grated citrus peel -- Don't use waxed fruits, if you do, wash them in hot water beforehand. (Heating your citrus fruits will also give you more juice)

 




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Tue 5 Sep #15 
Ruby Franks
Contributor

Please check my spelling, I'm a terrible speller and miss spell check. I hope this has got us on the road to a new subject for random brainoffs. Some answers are still long, but at least there is a mixture. The virtual is all very well, but I'd prefer to be sitting around a real table with wine and baked goods and bickering about definitions (Thanks Husband for that, this evening)




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Thu 7 Sep #16 
Ruby Franks
Contributor

Why is US State Capitals (Geography) not a subject for random brainoffs?




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Thu 7 Sep #17 
JMK
Editor

Updated. Removed a few that were causing issues. Still a couple I'm not sure about will see how they play. After play testing I have made it so that the llong part of the anser will will only appear in the question, not the choices so you will have one definition to read and not four. Thanks for your help.




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Thu 7 Sep #18 
JMK
Editor

U.S. State capitals I think was considered more U.S. knowledge than general, what do others think?




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Thu 7 Sep #19 
Ruby Franks
Contributor

It could be something that would help US players more than others. If I were  asked the State capital of South Dakota I might hesitate and get it wrong, but in a multiple choice I might get it quickly. It's the kind of quiz trivia that I would expect most English speaking quizzers to have a good go at.

What about Australian State and Territory Capitals? Counties Towns of England? Might balance things out a bit.

I'll still go back to my own personal WTFs - Celebrity Perfumes!!!! Pokemon!!!! ANYTHING TO DO WITH ANIMATION!!! But that for me isn't the point, if the question is phrased well, if the answer isn't too long and the subject isn't too crazily obscure why shouldn't it be included?




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Thu 7 Sep #20 
Ruby Franks
Contributor

Thanks JMK. Who would have thought cooking was so difficult?




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Thu 7 Sep #21 
Ruby Franks
Contributor

But you cooked up a storm.




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Thu 7 Sep #22 
JMK
Editor

Will trial making the U.S. Sate Capitals, Australian State and Territory Capitals and County Towns of England available.




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Thu 7 Sep #23 
JMK
Editor

Some subjects marked for review that could maybe be fixed:
Wine and Wine Terms 
Greek Mythological Beasts
Cocktails
Weather
Richter Scale
Fictional Animals - could easiy become 2 subjects, on for the type of animal and one for the source. I will take this one on.

Did a few quick fixes to a few others and put them back into randoms

 

 




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