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Songs of War

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Subject includes songs related to a particular War. For the sake of consistency the 1990-1991 Persian Gulf War is referred to as the Gulf War although it is noted that in neighbouring states it is known as the Second Gulf War, with the first being the Iraq-Iran War of 1980-1988.

126 facts:

417's Lament
   relates to the   
Second World War
Canadian
Abdul Abulbul Amir
   relates to the   
Crimean War
Reduces the war to two soldiers
Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate the Positive
   relates to the   
Second World War
A Johnny Mercer song
And the Band Played Waltzing Matilda
   relates to the   
First World War
"And the band played Waltzing Matilda, as the ship pulled away from the quay And amidst all the cheers, the flag-waving and tears, we sailed off for Gallipoli"
Annie Laurie
   relates to the   
Crimean War
Written by Lady John Douglas Scott
The Army of the Free
   relates to the   
American Civil War
“And will live and die together in the Army of the Free”
Aura Lee
   relates to the   
American Civil War
“Sunshine came along with thee, and swallows in the air”
Ballad of Chosin
   relates to the   
Korean War
“Oh the nights were cold in Korean soil”
Ballad of the Green Beret
   relates to the   
Vietnam War
Written by Staff Sgt Barry Sadler
The Ballad of Ira Hayes
   relates to the   
Second World War
Re: Native American who helped raise the flag at Iwo Jima
The Battle Cry of Freedom
   relates to the   
American Civil War
“We will rally from the hillside, we'll gather from the plain”
The Battle Hymn of the Republic
   relates to the   
American Civil War
An American abolitionist song. Lyrics written by Julia Ward Howe in November 1861.
Bo’dak Habibi
   relates to the   
Lebanon-Israeli War
(2006) Written by Rida Al Abdallah
The Bold Canadian
   relates to the   
War of 1812
Celebrated the conquering of Detroit
Boney’s Lamentation
   relates to the   
Napoleonic Wars
Regarding Napoleon’s abdication
Born in the USA
   relates to the   
Vietnam War
Bruce Springsteen
Boys of Australia
   relates to the   
First World War
“So beware, Mister Kaiser, there are more lions in the den”
The Boys of the Old Brigade
   relates to the   
Irish War of Independence
(1919-1921) “Oh father, why are you so sad?”
The British Army
   relates to the   
First World War
"If I had a face like you, I'd join the British army"
Brothers in Arms
   relates to the   
Falklands War
Performed by Dire Straits in memory of dead soldiers
Bunker Hill
   relates to the   
American Revolutionary War
1775
The Bushmen’s Corps
   relates to the   
Boer War
“And a match for the Boer I'll be!”
Charlie Don’t Surf
   relates to the   
Vietnam War
The Clash
Chevy Chase
   relates to the   
Anglo-Scottish Wars
Battle of Otterburn 1388
Close Every Door
   relates to the   
Second World War
References the Jewish Holocaust
Curl The Mo, Uncle Joe
   relates to the   
Second World War
“Aussies and Yanks know that you're a great chap”
Dadao March
   relates to the   
2nd Sino-Japanese War
“Cut the devil’s head off with the dadao”
The Death of General Wolfe
   relates to the   
Seven Years War
Died in the Battle of the Plains of Abraham
Der Fuehrer’s Face
   relates to the   
Second World War
So we heil (pffft) heil (pffft) right in Der Fuehrer's Face
The Digger
   relates to the   
First World War
Aussie song of courage
Draft Dodger Rag
   relates to the   
Vietnam War
Phil Ochs
Eve of Destruction
   relates to the   
Vietnam War
Barry McGuire
Ev’ry Time We Say Goodbye
   relates to the   
Second World War
Cole Porter
The Fightin’ Side of Me
   relates to the   
Vietnam War
Merle Haggard
For the Dear Old Flag I Die
   relates to the   
American Civil War
“Said the wounded drummer boy”
Forget Not the Field
   relates to the   
Williamite War
“Accurst is the march of that glory” (Irish)
Free America
   relates to the   
American Revolutionary War
Words set to the song “British Grenadiers”
From A Distance
   relates to the   
Gulf War
Cliff Richard did a cover version in 1990
The Gallant Hussar
   relates to the   
Napoleonic Wars
British Hussars were light cavalry (scouts)
Galveston
   relates to the   
Vietnam War
Glen Campbell
The Girl I Left Behind Me
   relates to the   
Seven Years War
Known in America as early as 1650
Give Peace a Chance
   relates to the   
Vietnam War
By John and Yoko
God Save the King
   relates to the   
Seven Years War
Written during the reign of George II
Goober Peas
   relates to the   
American Civil War
“Goodness, how delicious, Eating goober peas!”
Grafted Into the Army
   relates to the   
American Civil War
“Our Jimmy has gone for to live in a tent”
The Green Hills of Tyrol
   relates to the   
Crimean War
The Green Hills of Tyrol is one of the best known, and oldest, tunes played by pipe bands today. The tune is a pipe tune The Green Hills of Tyrol that was written during the Crimean War (1853-1856) by John MacLeod, a Pipe Major in the 93rd Highlanders. He adapted it after hearing a Sardinian band play a continental tune. That tune was based on an Alpine folk tune, and had also been used by Rossini in William Tell. The song is usually known now as The Scottish Solider instead of The Green Hills of Tyrol because of the lyrics which were added in 1961 by Andrew Stewart, a singer and comedian. His rendition held on for 36 weeks in the UK Singles Chart in 1961.
Guerillas’ Song
   relates to the   
2nd Sino-Japanese War
Describes the guerilla fighters of the Chinese Communist Party
The Harp of the Southern Cross
   relates to the   
Sudan War
Australia ready to fight for the Queen
Hava Nagila
   relates to the   
First World War
Written to celebrate the British victory in Palestine (1918)
Heart of Oak
   relates to the   
Napoleonic Wars
“They swear they’ll invade us, these terrible foes”
Hej Sokoly
   relates to the   
Polish-Soviet War
Translates roughly: “Hey, Falcons!”
Hey, Johnnie Cope, Are Ye Waking Yet?
   relates to the   
Anglo-Scottish Wars
Written by Adam Skirving, gives an account from the Jacobite viewpoint of the Battle of Prestonpans. In the battle, which took place during the Second Jacobite uprising, Sir John Cope was the commander of the government troops, and was defeated in a dawn attack by the Jacobites.
The Hirlas Horn
   relates to the   
Wars of the Roses
Battle of Bosworth Field. It was a drinking-horn (Welsh)
Hitler Has Only Got One Ball
   relates to the   
Second World War
“And Goebbels has no balls at all”
Horst-Wessel Song
   relates to the   
Second World War
Currently banned in Germany
The Hunters of Kentucky
   relates to the   
War of 1812
Became the campaign song for Andrew Jackson
Hunting the Hun
   relates to the   
First World War
“First you go get a gun, then you look for a hun”
Hurrah for the CRE
   relates to the   
Boer War
“We're working very hard down at Upnor Hard”
I Don’t Know Where I’m Going But I’m On My Way
   relates to the   
First World War
“And I'll do my duty-uty night or day”
I Have Come to Say Goodbye
   relates to the   
First World War
“For America, I sure must do my part”
I’ll Be Seeing You
   relates to the   
Second World War
Bing Crosby
Imagine
   relates to the   
Vietnam War
John Lennon
I’m Your Captain
   relates to the   
Vietnam War
Grand Funk Railroad
The Internationale
   relates to the   
Spanish Civil War
Socialist anthem
It’s Been a Long, Long, Time
   relates to the   
Second World War
Harry James
It's a Long Way to Tipperary
   relates to the   
First World War
British music hall and marching song written by Jack Judge
Jaza’iranaa
   relates to the   
Algerian War of Independence
“Hail, Oh Hail, Mountains of the Land”
John Walker’s Blues
   relates to the   
War on Terror
“We came to fight the Jihad”. John Phillip Walker Lindh was captured as an enemy combatant during the United States' 2001 invasion of Afghanistan. An American citizen, he is now serving a 20-year prison sentence in connection with his participation in Afghanistan's Taliban army.
Katy Cruel
   relates to the   
American Revolutionary War
Popular marching song of the war
Keep the Home Fires Burning
   relates to the   
First World War
Ivor Novello
The Kerry Recruit
   relates to the   
Crimean War
A young man from Kerry tells of his experience
Kiss Me Goodnight, Sergeant Major
   relates to the   
Second World War
“. . . be a mother to me”
The Lakes of Pontchartrain
   relates to the   
War of 1812
“I’ll drink a health to my Creole girl”
Lili Marlene
   relates to the   
Second World War
A huge propaganda tool for the Allies
Long Ago and Far Away
   relates to the   
Second World War
Jo Stafford
Lorena
   relates to the   
American Civil War
“Our heads will soon lie down, Lorena”
Macdermott’s War Song
   relates to the   
Crimean War
“With the battle cry of Britons, "Old England and Saint George!”
My Sweet Little Air Force Blue Suit
   relates to the   
Second World War
Canadian
On Songhua River
   relates to the   
2nd Sino-Japanese War
“When can I go back to my homeland?”
Over the Stone
   relates to the   
Wars of the Roses
Battle of Bosworth Field. “Let me ponder here alone” (Welsh)
Over There
   relates to the   
First World War
George M Cohan
Pack Up Your Troubles in Your Old Kit-Bag, and Smile, Smile, Smile
   relates to the   
First World War
Marching song written by George Henry Powell under the pseudonym of "George Asaf", and set to music by his brother Felix Powell, London 1915.
Paint It Black
   relates to the   
Vietnam War
The Rolling Stones
Peace Train
   relates to the   
Vietnam War
Cat Stevens
Police Action War
   relates to the   
Korean War
Truman’s characterization of the war
Praise the Lord and Pass the Ammunition
   relates to the   
Second World War
Frank Loesser
Remember Pearl Harbor
   relates to the   
Second World War
Sammy Kaye (1942)
Revolution
   relates to the   
Vietnam War
The Beatles
A Ric-A-Dam-Doo
   relates to the   
Second World War
Canadian
Roses of Picardy
   relates to the   
First World War
Wartime ballad written by British songwriter Frederick Weatherly while he was an army officer in 1916. Set to music by Haydn Wood, it was one of the most famous songs from World War.
The Rotten Bones Are Trembling
   relates to the   
Second World War
Official song of the Hitler youth
Run Rabbit Run
   relates to the   
Second World War
A defiant dig at the allegedly ineffectual Luftwaffe
Scots, Wha Hae
   relates to the   
Anglo-Scottish Wars
The lyrics were written by Robert Burns in 1793, in the form of a speech given by Robert the Bruce before the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314,
Shipbuilding
   relates to the   
Falklands War
Sung by Robert Wyatt
Shqiponja Partizane
   relates to the   
Second World War
Albanian marching song
Simple Song of Freedom
   relates to the   
Vietnam War
Bobby Darin
Sod ‘Em All
   relates to the   
First World War
Sung to “Bless ‘Em All”
Song of the Departure
   relates to the   
French Revolution
Official anthem of the First Empire
Sons of the Southern Sea
   relates to the   
Boer War
“Dedicated to the continents of Australia and New Zealand”
Tamo Daleko
   relates to the   
First World War
Serbian song of the war
Tenting on the Old Campground
   relates to the   
American Civil War
Favorite song of the Union army
There’ll Always Be an England
   relates to the   
Second World War
Sung by Vera Lynn
There’s a Long Trail A-Winding
   relates to the   
First World War
Published in 1914
The Thin Red Line
   relates to the   
Crimean War
A Glass Tiger song about Scots and Russians
Three Wonderful Letters From Home
   relates to the   
First World War
"Darling, God protect you over there,"
Till Then
   relates to the   
Second World War
Mills Brothers
Till We Meet Again
   relates to the   
First World War
“When we meet in the after awhile”
The Trooper
   relates to the   
Crimean War
Iron Maiden song about a British soldier
Universal Soldier
   relates to the   
Vietnam War
Donovan
Unknown Soldier
   relates to the   
Vietnam War
The Doors
Up and Waur Them A’, Willie
   relates to the   
First Jacobite Rebellion
Battle of Sheriffmuir. Scottish war song of 1715
Valley of Jarama
   relates to the   
Spanish Civil War
A song of the Republicans
Voices That Care
   relates to the   
Gulf War
“. . . are crying out loud”
Welcome Home
   relates to the   
First World War
“And this whole nation's proud to see you here”
We’ll Meet Again
   relates to the   
Second World War
Featured in the final scene of Stanley Kubrick's Dr. Strangelove.
When Johnny Comes Marching Home Again
   relates to the   
American Civil War
Written by Irish-American bandleader Patrick Gilmore and published under the pseudonym 'Louis Lambert, 1863
When the Lights Go On Again All Over the World
   relates to the   
Second World War
Vaughn Monroe's recording reached number one in 1943
When Yankee Doodle Learns to Parlez Vous Francais
   relates to the   
First World War
"Oo La La, Sweet Papa" he will teach them all to say”
Where Do We Go From Here
   relates to the   
First World War
“Slip a pill to Kaiser Bill and make him shed a tear”
Where Have All the Flowers Gone?
   relates to the   
Vietnam War
Pete Seeger
The White Cliffs of Dover
   relates to the   
Second World War
There are no bluebirds in Dover (American composer)
Yankee Doodle
   relates to the   
American Revolutionary War
There are some 190 verses to this song
The Yellow Rose of Texas
   relates to the   
American Civil War
“She's the sweetest rose of color this soldier ever knew”
Ye Parliament of England
   relates to the   
War of 1812
From the American point of view
Zemlyanka
   relates to the   
Second World War
Russian song about the Battle of Moscow
Zhuravli
   relates to the   
Second World War
“From gory fields who never came again” (Russian)


Facts contributed by:


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