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423 facts:

Adrienne Rich
   wrote   
Equinox
"Time split like a fruit between dark and light and a usual fog drags over this landfall"
Adrienne Rich
   wrote   
The School Among the Ruins
"Teaching the first lesson and the last-great falling light of summer"
Adrienne Rich
   wrote   
Seven Skins
"Walk along back of the library in 1952"
Adrienne Rich
   wrote   
This Evening Let's
"...not talk about my country How I'm from an optimistic culture"
A. E. Housman
   wrote   
When I Was One and Twenty
"...I heard a wise man say, 'Give crowns and pounds and guineas but not your heart away'"
Alan Dugan
   wrote   
Fabrication of Ancestors
"For old Billy Dugan, shot in the ass in the Civil War, my father said"
Alexander Kuo
   wrote   
If Death Became a Thing Like That
"If staring at the negative of a black and white photograph of my dead grandparents"
Alfred Lord Tennyson
   wrote   
Bugle Song
"The splendor falls on castle walls and snowy summits old"
Alfred Lord Tennyson
   wrote   
The Charge of the Light Brigade
"Half a league, half a league, Half a league onward, All in the valley of Death Rode the six hundred …"
Alfred Lord Tennyson
   wrote   
Crossing the Bar
"Sunset and evening star, and one clear call for me!"
Alfred Lord Tennyson
   wrote   
The Lady of Shalott
"On either side the river lie Long fields of barley and of rye …"
Alfred Lord Tennyson
   wrote   
Ulysses
"It little profits that an idle king, By this still hearth, among these barren crags …"
Allen Ginsberg
   wrote   
America
"America I've given you all and now I'm nothing America two dollars and twenty seven cents January 17, 1956"
Allen Ginsberg
   wrote   
Bixby Canyon
"Path crowded with thistle fern blue daisy, glassy grass, pale morninglory scattered on a granite hill"
Allen Ginsberg
   wrote   
Death to Van Gogh's Ear!
Poet is Priest Money has reckoned the soul of America"
Allen Ginsberg
   wrote   
Howl
"I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness"
Allen Ginsberg
   wrote   
A Supermarket in California
"What thoughts I have of you tonight Walt Whitman"
Allen Ginsberg
   wrote   
To a Dead Poet
"Some breath breathes out Adonais and Atlantis" -- for Pablo Neruda
Allen Ginsberg
   wrote   
Wichita Vortex Sutra
"I lift my voice aloud, make Mantra of American language now, pronounce the words beginning my own millennium"
Anita Endrezze Probst
   wrote   
Manifest Destiny
"Feathers blacken against the sun, rising like the songs of old warriors"
Anne Sexton
   wrote   
Again and Again and Again
"You said the anger would come back"
Anne Sexton
   wrote   
Courage
"It is in the small things we see it. The child's first step, as awesome as an earthquake"
Anne Sexton
   wrote   
Mothers
"Oh mother, here in your lap, as good as a bowlful of clouds"
Anne Sexton
   wrote   
The Rowing Endeth
"I'm mooring my rowboat at the dock of the island called God"
Anne Sexton
   wrote   
Welcome Morning
"There is joy in all: in the hair I brush each morning, in the Canon towel, newly washed"
Anselm Hollo
   wrote   
Message
"hello! i am one of your molecules! i started out from crab nebula"
Anselm Hollo
   wrote   
Old Space Cadet Speaking
"let me tell you, the captain knew exactly what he would do"
Anselm Hollo
   wrote   
Song of the Tusk
"the elephant bogged down thousands of years ago"
Banjo Paterson
   wrote   
The Man from Snowy River
"There was movement at the station, for the word had passed around That the colt from old Regret had got away …"
Bartolo Cattafi
   wrote   
Departure from Greenwich
"You always leave from Greenwich, from the zero marked on every map"
Bartolo Cattafi
   wrote   
Helmsman
"Then I went to him and said, If you please turn to the right that is the heart's archipelago"
Bartolo Cattafi
   wrote   
Magic Spell
"I don't know where he comes from. He crossed the circumference at one point and set up his tents nearby"
Bill Holm
   wrote   
The Icelandic Language
"In this language, no industrial revolution, no pasteurized milk, no oxygen, no telephone"
Billy Collins
   wrote   
Another Reason Why I Don't Keep a Gun in the House
"The neighbors' dog will not stop barking"
Billy Collins
   wrote   
Dharma
"The way the dog trots out the front door every morning without a hat or an umbrella"
Billy Collins
   wrote   
Nightclub
"Your are so beautiful and I am a fool to be in love with you is a theme that keeps coming up"
Billy Collins
   wrote   
Passengers
"At the gate. I sit in a row of blue seats with the possible company of my death"
Carl Rakosi
   wrote   
The Old Codger's Lament
"Who can say now, 'when I was young, the country was very beautiful?'"
Carl Sandburg
   wrote   
Chicago
"Hog butcher for the World, Tool Maker, Stacker of Wheat"
Carl Sandburg
   wrote   
Fog
"The fog comes on little cat feet."
Carl Sandburg
   wrote   
The Junk Man
"I am glad God saw Death and gave Death a job taking care of all who are tired of living"
Carl Sandburg
   wrote   
Languages
"There are no handles upon a language whereby men take hold of it and mark it with signs for its remembrance"
Carl Sandburg
   wrote   
Our Prayer of Thanks
"For the gladness here where the sun is shining at evening on the weeds at the river"
Carl Sandburg
   wrote   
The Road and the End
"I shall foot it down the roadway in the dusk"
Carl Sandburg
   wrote   
To a Dead Man
"Over the dead line we have called to you to come across with a word for us"
Charles Baudelaire
   wrote   
The Balcony
"Mother of memories, mistress of mistresses...."
Charles Baudelaire
   wrote   
The Dance of Death
"...In every clime and under every sun, death laughs at ye, mad mortels, as ye run...."
Charles Baudelaire
   wrote   
Enivrez-Vous
"One should always be drunk. That's all there is to it"
Charles Baudelaire
   wrote   
Exotic Perfume
"When with closed eyes in autumn's eves of gold, I breathe the burning odors of your breast...."
Charles Bukowski
   wrote   
The Days Run Away Like Wild Horses Over the Hills
"the phone rings and it is usually the woman with the sexy voice from the phone company"
Charles Bukowski
   wrote   
Dostoevsky
"against the wall the firing squad ready. then he got a reprieve. suppose they had shot Dostoevsky?"
Charles Bukowski
   wrote   
The Great One
"down at the end of the bar he used to bum drinks, now he is a balding man"
Charles Bukowski
   wrote   
The Last Song
"...only one thing comes without a disguise and you only see it once, or maybe never...."
Charles Bukowski
   wrote   
The Poetry Reading
"at high noon at a small college near the beach, sober"
Charles Bukowski
   wrote   
To Hell With Robert Schumann
"I finished my drink and went upstairs to hear the second half"
Charles Reznikoff
   wrote   
Heart and Clock
"the clocks drip in every room-our lives are leaking from the places"
Charles Reznikoff
   wrote   
Holocaust
Poem consists of testimony of survivors
Charles Reznikoff
   wrote   
New Year's
"The solid houses in the mist are thin as tissue paper"
Charles Reznikoff
   wrote   
Te Deum
Objectivist poet, 1894-1976; "Not because of victories I sing, having none"
Charles Simic
   wrote   
Stone
"Go inside a stone. That would be my way. Let somebody else become a dove"
Charles Simic
   wrote   
Summer Morning
"I love to stay in bed all morning, covers thrown off, naked, eyes closed, listening"
Charles Simic
   wrote   
The White Room
"The obvious is difficult to prove. Many prefer the hidden"
Ch'en Yu I
   wrote   
Travelling in Hsiang County
"Flying flowers from both shores glow red on our boat"
Ch'in Kuan
   wrote   
Composed in a Dream
"Drunk, lying in the shade of the old rattan blinds, I can't tell North from South" -- 1048-1100
Conrad Hilberry
   wrote   
Blind Girl on the Santa Fe
"Not diverted by this windowful of cows or the distant tractor like a pen stroke"
Czeslaw Milosz
   wrote   
Account
"The history of my stupidity would fill many volumes."
Dante
   wrote   
The Divine Comedy
Widely considered the central epic poem of Italian literature, and is seen as one of the greatest works of world literature
David Ignatow
   wrote   
Kaddish
"Whisper to the rock, I found you, whisper to the earth, Mother, I have found her, and I am safe and always have been"
David Ignatow
   wrote   
The Story of Progress
"The apple I held and bit into was for me. The friend who spoke to me was for me"
David R. Slavitt
   wrote   
Titanic
"The cold water is anaesthetic and very quick. The cries on all sides must be a comfort. We all go: only a few, first class"
Denise Levertov
   wrote   
Come Into Animal Presence
"...no man is so guileless as the serpent. The lonely white rabbit on the roof is a star"
Dan Gerber
   wrote   
My Father's Fields
"They looked like blackbirds, my father said, that first burst of shrapnel"
Dan Gerber
   wrote   
The Tragedy of Action
"Tomorrow afternoon we will carry these books to the basement"
D. H. Lawrence
   wrote   
Humming Bird
"We look at him through the wrong end of the long telescope of Time"
D. H. Lawrence
   wrote   
Piano
"Softly, in the dusk, a woman is singing to me, taking me back down the vista of years"
Diane Wakoski
   wrote   
When Breakfast is Brought By the Morning Star
"...she is imagining that she is writing in a book with white pages"
Donald Hall
   wrote   
Eleanor's Letters
"I who picked up the neat old letters never knew the last names to complete"
Donald Hall
   wrote   
Kicking the Leaves
"...October, as we walk home together from the game, in Ann Arbor"
Donald Hall
   wrote   
The Man in the Dead Machine
"High on a slope in New Guinea the Grumann Hellcat lodges among bright vines"
Donald Hall
   wrote   
Ox Cart Man
"In October of the year, he counts potatoes dug from the brown field"
Donald Hall
   wrote   
Smile
"She was twenty-five when they settled in our town"
Donald Hall
   wrote   
The Town of Hill
"Back of the dam, under a flat pad of water, church bells ring"
Donald Hall
   wrote   
White Apples
"When my father had been dead a week I woke with his voice in my ear"
Donald Justice
   wrote   
The Assassination
"It begins again, the nocturnal pulse. It courses through the cables laid for it" -- June 5, 1968
Donald Justice
   wrote   
Homage to the Memory of Wallace Stevens
"Hartford is cold today but no colder for your absence"
Donald Justice
   wrote   
Poem to Be Read at 3 A.M.
"Excepting the diner on the outskirts the town of Ladora at 3 a.m. was dark"
Donald Justice
   wrote   
The Pupil
"Picture me, the shy pupil at the door, one small, tight fist clutching the dread Czerny"
Donald Justice
   wrote   
Variations on a Text by Vallejo
"I will die in Miami in the sun, on a day when the sun is very bright"
Dorothea Mackellar
   wrote   
I Love a Sunburnt Country
"I love a sunburnt country a land of sweeping plains ..."
Dr. John McCrae
   wrote   
In Flanders Fields
"In Flanders fields the poppies blow Between the crosses row on row, That mark our place …"
Dylan Thomas
   wrote   
And Death Shall Have No Dominion
"...though they sink through the sea they shall rise again...."
Dylan Thomas
   wrote   
Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night
"Do not go gentle into that good night, Old age should burn and rave at close of day; Rage, rage against the dying of the light …"
Dylan Thomas
   wrote   
Especially When the October Wind
"...with frosty fingers punishes my hair, caught by the crabbing sun I walk on fire"
Dylan Thomas
   wrote   
Light Breaks Where No Sun Shines
"...where no sea runs, the waters of the heart push in their tides"
Edgar A. Guest
   wrote   
Success
"I hold no dream of fortunes vast, nor seek undying fame"
Edgar Allan Poe
   wrote   
Annabel Lee
"it was many and many a year ago, in a kingdom by the sea"
Edgar Allan Poe
   wrote   
A Dream Within a Dream
"Take this kiss upon the brow! And, in parting from you now, Thus much let me avow …"
Edgar Allan Poe
   wrote   
The Raven
"Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary, Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore …"
Edgar Allan Poe
   wrote   
Ulalume
"The skies they were ashen and sober"; 1847
Edna St. Vincent Millay
   wrote   
Dirge Without Music
"I am not resigned to the shutting away of loving hearts in the hard ground"
Edna St. Vincent Millay
   wrote   
Sonnet XLIII
"What lips my lips have kissed, and where, and why, I have forgotten"
Edward Dorn
   wrote   
The Air of June Sings
"Quietly and while at rest on the trim grass I have gazed"
Edward Dorn
   wrote   
The Contract
"The Middle West supplies the margins in return for an atrophication"
Edward Dorn
   wrote   
Executioner. Stay Thy Cold Blade
"As knowledge grows it becomes apparent that the brain is a machine"
Edward Dorn
   wrote   
Gunslinger
An epic (or anti-epic) poem in four volumes; "The curtain might rise anywhere on a single speaker...I met in Mesilla the Cautious Gunslinger"
Edward Dorn
   wrote   
The Octopus Thinks With Its Arms
"Out of the total of some 500 million nerve-cells 300 million or more are in the arms"
E. E. Cummings
   wrote   
The Cambridge Ladies Who Live in Furnished Souls
"...are beautiful and have comfortable minds"
E. E. Cummings
   wrote   
I Sing of Olaf Glad and Big
"...whose warmest heart recoiled at war"
E. E. Cummings
   wrote   
May I Feel Said He
I'll squeal said she...
E. E. Cummings
   wrote   
Spring is Like a Perhaps Hand
"...(which comes carefully out of Nowhere) arranging a window"
E. E. Cummings
   wrote   
YgUDuh
"ydoan...yunnuhstan...ydoan o...yunnuhstand dem...yguduh ged..." And so on.
Elizabeth Barrett Browning
   wrote   
How Do I Love Thee?
"How do I love thee? Let me count the ways. I love thee to the depth and breadth and height …"
Elizabeth Barrett Browning
   wrote   
A Man's Requirements
"Love me Sweet, with all thou art"
Elizabeth Bishop
   wrote   
At the Fishhouses
"Although it is a cold evening, down by one of the fishhouses"
Elizabeth Bishop
   wrote   
Manners For a Child of 1918
"My grandfather said to me as we sat on the wagon seat"
Emily Dickinson
   wrote   
Because I Could Not Stop for Death
"he kindly stopped for me"
Emily Dickinson
   wrote   
Her Face Was in a Bed of Hair
"...like flowers in a plot"
Emily Dickinson
   wrote   
I Heard a Fly Buzz-When I Died
"the Stillness in the Room was like the Stillness in the Air"
Emily Dickinson
   wrote   
I Years Had Been From Home
"I Years had been from Home And now before the Door I dared not enter, lest a Face I never saw before Stare solid into mine And ask my Business there …"
Emily Dickinson
   wrote   
There is Another Sky
"There is another sky, Ever serene and fair, And there is another sunshine, Though it be darkness there …"
Erica Jong
   wrote   
Parable of the Four-Poster
"Because she wants to touch him she moves away"
Ernest Lawrence Thayer
   wrote   
Casey at the Bat
"It looked extremely rocky for the Mudville nine that day; The score stood four to two with but one inning more to play. …"
Ezra Pound
   wrote   
The Cantos
"And then went down to the ship, Set keel to breakers, forth of the godly sea"
Ezra Pound
   wrote   
A Girl
"The tree has entered my hands, The sap has ascended my arms, The tree has grown in my breast--
Federico Garcia Lorca
   wrote   
City That Does Not Sleep
Trans. Robert Bly; "In the sky there is nobody asleep"
Federico Garcia Lorca
   wrote   
Gacela of the Dark Death
"I want to sleep the sleep of the apples"; trans. by Robery Bly
Frank O'Hara
   wrote   
Animals
"Have you forgotten what we were like then when we were still first rate"
Frank O'Hara
   wrote   
Meditations in an Emergency
"Am I to become profligate as if I were a blonde?"
Galway Kinnell
   wrote   
After Making Love We Hear Footsteps
"For I can snore like a bullhorn or play loud music"
Galway Kinnell
   wrote   
The Bear
"In late winter I sometimes glimpse bits of steam coming up from some fault in the old snow"
Galway Kinnell
   wrote   
Blackberry Eating
"I love to go out in late September among the fat, overripe, icy, blackberries"
Galway Kinnell
   wrote   
Fergus Falling
"He climbed to the top of one of those million white pines"
Galway Kinnell
   wrote   
The Fly
"The fly I've just brushed from my face keeps buzzing about me, flesh-eater starved for the soul"
Galway Kinnell
   wrote   
How Many Nights
"...have I lain in terror, O Creator Spirit, Maker of night and day"
Galway Kinnell
   wrote   
The Porcupine
"Fatted on herbs, swollen on crabapples, puffed up on bast and phloem"
Galway Kinnell
   wrote   
The Sadness of Brothers
"He comes to me like a mouth speaking from under several inches of water"
Galway Kinnell
   wrote   
St Francis and the Sow
"The bud stands for all things, even for those things that don't flower"
Galway Kinnell
   wrote   
Why Regret?
Didn't you like the way the ants help the peony globes open by eating off the glue?"
Gary Snyder
   wrote   
Burned Out
"An ancient cedar stump to burn against which piled the limbs of gnarly wolf-tree pine"
Gary Snyder
   wrote   
For Alan Watts
"He blazed out a new path for us"; on his death
Gary Snyder
   wrote   
Hay for the Horses
"He had driven half the night from far down San Joaquin"
Gary Snyder
   wrote   
Journeys
"Genji caught a grey bird, fluttering"
Gary Snyder
   wrote   
This Poem is for Bear
"A bear down under the cliff. She is eating huckleberries. They are ripe now"
Gary Snyder
   wrote   
We Make Our Vows Together With All Beings
"Eating a sandwich at work in the woods, as a doe nibbles buckbrush in snow"
Gary Snyder
   wrote   
The Years
"The years seem to tumble faster and faster I work harder the boys get larger planting apples and cherry"
George Oppen
   wrote   
Of Being Numerous
"There are things we live among and to see them is to know ourselves"
Guillaume Apollinaire
   wrote   
Le Pont Mirabeau
"Sous le pont Mirabeau coule la Seine et nos amours"
Guillaume Apollinaire
   wrote   
There Is
"...this ship which has taken my beloved back again"- trans. by Michael Benedikt
Gwendolyn Brooks
   wrote   
The Lovers of the Poor
"Keeping their scented bodies in the center of the hall…they allow their lovely skirts to graze no wall"
Hart Crane
   wrote   
At Melville's Tomb
"Often beneath the wave, wide from this ledge, the dice of drowned men's bones"
Hayden Carruth
   wrote   
Because I Am
For Sidney Bechet, 1897-1959
Hayden Carruth
   wrote   
The Fantastic Names of Jazz
"Zoot Sims, Joshua Redman, Billie Holiday, Pete Fountain"
Hayden Carruth
   wrote   
Forty-Five
"When I was forty-five I lay for hours beside a pool, the green hazy springtime water"
Hayden Carruth
   wrote   
Journey to a Known Place
Long poem beginning, "Tundra, the distant marches, and wind veering, clatter of steely grasses"
Hayden Carruth
   wrote   
Memory
"A woman I used to know well died a week ago"
Henry Lawson
   wrote   
After All
"The brooding ghosts of Australian night have gone from the bush and town; My spirit revives in the morning breeze …"
Henry Lawson
   wrote   
Up the Country
"I am back from up the country -- very sorry that I went"
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
   wrote   
Evangeline
Long epic poem about the removal of the Acadian people
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
   wrote   
The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere
"Listen my children and you shall hear Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere …"
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
   wrote   
My Lost Youth
"Often I think of the beautiful town that is seated by the sea"
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
   wrote   
Santa Filomena
"Whene'er a noble deed is wrought"
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
   wrote   
The Song of Hiawatha
"By the shores of Gitche Gumee" [Lake Superior]
Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
   wrote   
The Village Blacksmith
"Under the spreading chestnut tree the village smithy stands …"
Hermann Hesse
   wrote   
Sometimes
"...when a bird cries out, or the wind sweeps through a tree"
Homer
   wrote   
The Iliad
Actually, the Iliad and Odyssey are attributed to Homer but it is not known definitively who Homer was, when he lived, where he lived, and whether he was sole author or one of many [in the oral tradition] of these two epic poems.
Homer
   wrote   
The Odyssey
This Greek epic poem is a sequel to the "Iliad" about hero Odysseus' return to Ithaca
Howard Moss
   wrote   
The Persistence of Song
"Although it is not yet evening, the secretaries have changed their frocks as if it were time for dancing"
Howard Nemerov
   wrote   
Vermeer
"Taking what is, and seeing it as it is, pretending no heroic stances or gestures"
Jack Kerouac
   wrote   
Mexico City Blues
In 242 choruses
Jack Kerouac
   wrote   
Rimbaud
"Arthur! On t'appela pas Jean!"
Jack Kerouac
   wrote   
Some Western Haikus
"Missing a kick at the icebox door, it closed anyway"
Jacques Prévert
   wrote   
Déjeuner Du Matin
Recently voted by the French people the most popular French poet of all time: "Il a mis le café dans la tasse"
James K. Baxter
   wrote   
The Eagle
"Were it the parrot brazen and metallic cawing Were it the brilliant focussed eyes of water fowl …"
James Tipton
   wrote   
America: The Elephant
"1824 Old Bet, bought by a Somers man, went mad in Western Connecticut"
James Welch
   wrote   
In My First Hard Springtime
"Those red men you offended were my brothers. Town drinkers, Buckles Pipe, Star Boy"
James Welch
   wrote   
The Man from Washington
"The end came easy for most of us. Packed away in our crude beginnings in some far corner of a flat world"
James Wright
   wrote   
Autumn Begins in Martins Ferry, Ohio
"In the Shreve High football stadium, I think of Polacks nursing long beers in Tiltonsville"
James Wright
   wrote   
Beginning
"The moon drops one or two feathers into the fields"
James Wright
   wrote   
A Blessing
"Just off the highway to Rochester, Minnesota, twilight bounds softly forth on the grass"
James Wright
   wrote   
Milkweed
"While I stood here, in the open, lost in myself"
James Wright
   wrote   
The Minneapolis Poem
"I wonder how many old men last winter hungry and frightened by namelessness prowled"
James Wright
   wrote   
On the Skeleton of a Hound
"Nightfall, that saw the morning-glories float tendril and string against the crumbling wall"
James Wright
   wrote   
Saint Judas
"When I went out to kill myself, I caught a pack of hoodlums beating up a man"
James Wright
   wrote   
To a Blossoming Pear Tree
"Beautiful natural blossoms, pure delicate body, you stand without trembling"
Jane Kenyon
   wrote   
Let Evening Come
"Let it come, as it will, and don't be afraid. God does not leave us comfortless, so let evening come"
Jane Kenyon
   wrote   
Twilight: After Haying
"The last sweet exhalations of timothy and vetch go out with the song of the bird, the ravaged field grows wet with dew"
Jim Harrison
   wrote   
After Reading Takahashi
"Nothing is the same to anyone. Moscow is east of Nairobi"
Jim Harrison
   wrote   
Counting Birds
"As a child, fresh out of the hospital with tape covering the left side of my face"
Jim Harrison
   wrote   
February Swans
"heads looped low and tucked to the wind; looking for fish in the deep greenness of water"
Jim Harrison
   wrote   
Natural World
"The earth is almost round. The seas are curved and hug the earth"
Jim Harrison
   wrote   
Word Drunk
"I think of the twenty thousand poems of Li Po and wonder"
John Ashbery
   wrote   
Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror
Title poem in Pulitzer Prize winning collection
John Berryman
   wrote   
Address to the Lord
"Master of beauty, craftsman of the snowflake, inimitable contriver"
John Donne
   wrote   
Batter My Heart
Used as aria sung by Robert Oppenheimer in John Adam's 2005 opera, Doctor Atomic
John Donne
   wrote   
For Whom the Bell Tolls
"Perchance for whom this bell tolls may be so ill, as that he knows not it tolls for him...."
John Greenleaf Whittier
   wrote   
Barbara Frietchie
"Up from the meadows rich with corn"
John Greenleaf Whittier
   wrote   
Snowbound
"The sun that brief December day rose cheerless over hills of gray"
John Keats
   wrote   
Ode to a Grecian Urn
"Thou still unravish'd bride of quietness, thou foster-child of silence and slow time"
John Keats
   wrote   
Ode to a Nightingale
"My heart aches, and a drowsy numbness pains My sense, as though of hemlock I had drunk, Or emptied some dull opiate to the drains …"
John Keats
   wrote   
A Thing of Beauty
"A thing of beauty is a joy forever"
John Keats
   wrote   
To Autumn
"Season of mists and mellow fruitfulness. Close bosom-friend of the maturing sun"
John Milton
   wrote   
Paradise Lost
Originally published in 1667 in ten books with over 10,000 individual lines of verse
John Updike
   wrote   
Dog's Death
"She must have been kicked unseen or brushed by a car"
John Updike
   wrote   
Perfection Wasted
"And another regrettable thing about death is the ceasing of your own brand of magic"
Jorge Luis Borges
   wrote   
The Enigmas
"I who am singing these lines today will be tomorrow the enigmatic corpse"; trans. John Updike
Joyce Kilmer
   wrote   
Trees
"I think that I shall never see a poem lovely as a tree."
Juan Ramón Jiménez
   wrote   
The Lamb Was Bleating Softly
"...The young jackass grew happier with his excited bray."; translation by Robert Bly
Kenneth Patchen
   wrote   
The Grand Palace of Versailles
"An elephant made of pink cotton ...Towers of lace under which satin-heeled Gentlemen sit"
Kenneth Patchen
   wrote   
Lunch Wagon on Highway 57
"The big lad with too much face and a voice fuzzed like a slice of grand larceny, pointed his fork"
Kenneth Patchen
   wrote   
The State of the Nation
"Understand that they were sitting just inside the door at a little table with two full beers and two empties"
Kenneth Rexroth
   wrote   
Another Spring
"The seasons revolve and the years change with no assistance or supervision"
Kenneth Rexroth
   wrote   
The Dragon and the Unicorn
" 'And what is love?' said Pilate, and washed his hands"
Kenneth Rexroth
   wrote   
The Family
"Late night coming back to Melbourne from a party on the Kangaroo Plains"
Kenneth Rexroth
   wrote   
The Heart's Garden
Long poem beginning, "Young rice plants are just being transplanted"
Kenneth Rexroth
   wrote   
Now the Starlit Moonless Spring
"...night stands over the Fountaine De Medicis"
Kenneth Rexroth
   wrote   
The Phoenix and the Tortoise
"Webs of misery spread in the brain, in the Spring in the soft heat"
Kenneth Rexroth
   wrote   
The Signature of All Things
My head and shoulders, and my book in the cool shade"
Langston Hughes
   wrote   
Advertisement For the Waldorf-Astoria
"take a room at the new Waldorf, you down-and-outers"
Langston Hughes
   wrote   
Let America Be America Again
"Let America be America again. Let it be the dream it used to be. Let it be the pioneer on the plain seeking a home where he himself is free."
Lawrence Ferlinghetti
   wrote   
A Buddha in the Woodpile
"If there had been only one Buddhist in the woodpile in Waco, Texas"
Lawrence Ferlinghetti
   wrote   
Christ Climbed Down
"...from His bare Tree this year"
Leslie Silko
   wrote   
Prayer to the Pacific
"I traveled to the ocean distant from my southwest land of sandrock"
Leslie Silko
   wrote   
Toe'osh: A Laguna Coyote Story
"In the wintertime at night we tell coyote stories" -- for Simon Ortiz
Linda Pastan
   wrote   
The Answering Machine
"I call and hear your voice on the answering machine weeks after your death"
Linda Pastan
   wrote   
Bess
"When Bess, the landlord's black-eyed daughter, waited for her highwayman"
Linda Pastan
   wrote   
Death of a Potter
"When her wheel suddenly stopped turning, a round world was stilled on its axis"
Linda Pastan
   wrote   
Departures
"They seemed to all take off at once: Aunt Grace whose kidneys closed shop; cousin Rose"
Linda Pastan
   wrote   
The Last Uncle
"The last uncle is pushing off in his funeral skiff (the usual black limo)"
Li Po
   wrote   
Waking From Drunkenness on a Spring Day
"A lonely bird was singing amid the flowers"
Lord Byron
   wrote   
She Walks in Beauty Like the Night
"SHE walks in beauty, like the night. Of cloudless climes and starry skies …"
Louis MacNeice
   wrote   
The British Museum Reading Room
"Under the hive-like dome the stooping haunted readers go up and down the alleys"
Margaret Atwood
   wrote   
Disturbed Earth
"...some plants sprout quickly in it. Sow thistles come to mind"
Margaret Atwood
   wrote   
The Door
"The door swings open, you look in. It's dark in there"
Margaret Atwood
   wrote   
One Day You Will Reach...
"...a bend in your life, time will curve like a wind"
Margaret Atwood
   wrote   
Reindeer Moss on Granite
"This is a tiny language, smaller than Gallic; when you have your boots on"
Margaret Atwood
   wrote   
The Third Age Visits the Arctic
"They like it when you visit them, says Aaju. Just say hello"
Margaret Atwood
   wrote   
War Photo
"The dead woman thrown down on the dusty road is very beautiful"
Marge Piercy
   wrote   
Digging In
"This fall you will taste carrots that you planted, you thinned, you mulched, you watered"
Marge Piercy
   wrote   
To Be of Use
"The people I love best jump into work first without dallying in the shallows"
Marianne Moore
   wrote   
Baseball and Writing
"Who is excited? Might it be I?"
Mark Strand
   wrote   
Eating Poetry
"Ink runs from the corners of my mouth. There is no happiness like mine."
Mark Strand
   wrote   
My Mother on an Evening in Late Summer
"When the moon appears and a few wind-stricken barns stand out...."
Mary Fyre
   wrote   
Do Not Stand at My Grave and Weep
"Do not stand at my grave and weep; I am not there. I do not sleep …"
Matthew Arnold
   wrote   
Dover Beach
"The sea is calm to-night, the tide is full, the moon lies fair upon the straits"
Maxine Kumin
   wrote   
Family Reunion
"The week in August you come home, adult, professional, aloof, we roast and carve the fatted calf"
Maya Angelou
   wrote   
A Brave and Startling Truth
"We, unaccustomed to courage exiles from delight"
Maya Angelou
   wrote   
Phenomenal Woman
"Pretty women wonder where my secret lies. I'm not cute or built to suit a fashion model's size But when I start to tell them, They think I'm telling lies.
Maya Angelou
   wrote   
Still I Rise
"You may write me down in history with your bitter, twisted lies"
May Sarton
   wrote   
August Third
"These days lifting myself up like a heavy weight, old camel getting to her knees"
May Sarton
   wrote   
Death and the Turtle
"Who will remember you when I am gone, my darling ones, or who remember me?"
Mei Mei Berssenbrugge
   wrote   
Abortion
"When we walked outside at sunset a tenement was burning to the ground"
Michael McClure
   wrote   
The List
"OLD MEN SLEEPING IN CARS, a hawk on a boulder dripping with fog, ten deer"
Muriel Rukeyser
   wrote   
Neruda, The Wine
"We are the seas through whom the great fish passed and passes"
N. Scott Momaday
   wrote   
Carriers of the Dream Wheel
"This is the Wheel of Dreams which is carried on their voices"
N. Scott Momaday
   wrote   
The Gourd Dancer
"Another season centers on this place. Like memory the blood congeals in it"
Octavio Paz
   wrote   
Sunstone
"un sauce de cristal, un chopo de agua, un alto surtidor que el viento arquea"
Pablo Neruda
   wrote   
Carnal Apple, Woman Filled, Burning Moon
"dark smell of seaweed, crush of mud and light"
Pablo Neruda
   wrote   
Enigmas
"...and in my net, during the night, I woke up naked, the only thing caught, a fish trapped inside the wind"; translation by Robert Bly
Pablo Neruda
   wrote   
I Do Not Love You Except Because I Love You
"My heart moves from cold to fire"
Pablo Neruda
   wrote   
If You Forget Me
"I want you to know one thing. You know how this is: if I look at the crystal moon, at the red branch of the slow autumn at my window …"
Pablo Neruda
   wrote   
Nothing But Death
"There are cemetaries that are lonely, graves full of bones that do not make a sound"; trans. by Robert Bly
Pablo Neruda
   wrote   
Saddest Poem
"I can write the saddest poem of all tonight...."
Paul Bowles
   wrote   
Blessed Are the Meek
"Blessed be God and I Blessed be all his angels and all my thoughts"
Paul Bowles
   wrote   
Here I Am
"When I am here I shall not mind I shall merely murmur"
Paul Bowles
   wrote   
Sidi Amar in Winter
"But I think I have never seen your face A rainy day, when the sky's grey arteries pulse"
Paul Valléry
   wrote   
The Graveyard By the Sea
"This quiet roof, where dove-sails saunter by...."
Percy Bysshe Shelley
   wrote   
Indian Serenade
"I arise from dreams of thee in the first sweet sleep of night"
Percy Bysshe Shelley
   wrote   
Ode to the West Wind
"O wild West Wind, thou breath of Autumn's being"
Percy Bysshe Shelley
   wrote   
Ozymandias
"I met a traveller from an antique land Who said: "Two vast and trunkless legs of stone Stand in the desert …"
Philip Larkin
   wrote   
Annus Mirabilis
"Sexual intercourse began in nineteen sixty-three"
Rachel Field
   wrote   
Meeting
"As I went home on the old wood road,. With my basket and lesson book …"
Rachel Field
   wrote   
Something Told the Wild Geese
"Something told the wild geese It was time to go …"
Rainer Maria Rilke
   wrote   
Leda
"When the god, needing something, decided to become a swan"; trans by Robert Bly
Ralph Waldo Emerson
   wrote   
Terminus
"It is now time to be old, to take in the sail"
Randall Jarrell
   wrote   
Bats
"A bat is born naked and blind and pale. His mother makes a pocket of her tail and catches him"
Ray Young Bear
   wrote   
Differences
"coughing up blood before the sun rose. i spit out the wind"
Ray Young Bear
   wrote   
Trains Made of Stone
"until that sun, which keeps asking for an answer, agrees to remain still"
Richard Brautigan
   wrote   
The Galilee Hitch-Hiker
In 9 parts; "Baudelaire was driving a Model A across Galilee"
Richard Brautigan
   wrote   
Your Catfish Friend
"If I were to live my life in catfish forms, in scaffolds of skin and whiskers"
Robert Bly
   wrote   
The Eel in the Cave
"Our veins are open to shadow, and our fingertips porous to murder"
Robert Bly
   wrote   
For My Son, Noah, Ten Years Old
"Night and day arrive, and day after day goes by, and what is old remains old"
Robert Bly
   wrote   
November Day at McClure's
"Alone on the jagged rock at the south end of McClure's beach"
Robert Bly
   wrote   
Snowbanks North of the House
"Those great sweeps of snow that stop suddenly six feet from the house"
Robert Bly
   wrote   
When My Dead Father Called
"Last night I dreamt my father called to us. He was stuck somewhere"
Robert Burns
   wrote   
Comin Thro' the Rye
"...poor body, comin thro' the rye, she draigl't her petticoatie comin thro' the rye."
Robert Burns
   wrote   
A Red, Red Rose
"O my luve's like a red, red rose, that's newly sprung in June …"
Robert Burns
   wrote   
To a Louse
"Ha! Whare ye gaun, ye crawlin' ferlie?"
Robert Burns
   wrote   
To a Mouse
"Wee, sleekit, cowrin, tim'rous beastie, O, what a panic's in thy breastie!"
Robert Creeley
   wrote   
The Moon
"Earlier in the evening the moon was clear to the east"
Robert Duncan
   wrote   
Night Scenes
"The moon's up-riding makes a line flowing out into lion's mane of traffic"
Robert Duncan
   wrote   
Roots and Branches
"Sail, Monarchs, rising and falling"
Robert Francis
   wrote   
Waxwings
"Four Tao philosophers as cedar waxwings chat on a February berrybush"
Robert Frost
   wrote   
Acquainted With the Night
"I have been one acquainted with the night. I have walked out in rain - and back in rain. I have outwalked the furthest city light..."
Robert Frost
   wrote   
After Apple-Picking
"My long two-pointed ladder's sticking through a tree, Toward heaven still, And there's a barrel that I didn't fill …"
Robert Frost
   wrote   
Birches
"When I see birches bend to left and right across the lines of straighter dark trees"
Robert Frost
   wrote   
Fire and Ice
" Some say the world will end in fire, Some say in ice …"
Robert Frost
   wrote   
The Investment
"Over back where they speak of life as staying ('You couldn't call it a living, for it ain't')"
Robert Frost
   wrote   
The Road Not Taken
"Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, And sorry I could not travel both And be one traveler, long I stood …"
Robert Frost
   wrote   
Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening
"Whose woods these are I think I know. His house is in the village though …"
Robert Louis Stevenson
   wrote   
I Will Make You Brooches
"...and toys for your delight of bird-song at morning and star-shine at night"
Robert Service
   wrote   
The Shooting of Dan McGrew
"A bunch of the boys were whooping it up in the Malamute saloon"
Robert Vas Dias
   wrote   
Petoskey Stone
"On the lake-bottom near the shore it appears to move among others"
Robinson Jeffers
   wrote   
Animals
"At dawn a knot of sea-lions lies off the shore in the slow swell between the rock and the cliff"
Robinson Jeffers
   wrote   
Continent's End
"At the equinox when the earth was veiled in a late rain, wreathed with wet poppies, waiting spring"
Robinson Jeffers
   wrote   
Shakespeare's Grave
"Oh, a thousand years will hardly leach, he thought, this dust of that fire"
Robinson Jeffers
   wrote   
Shine, Perishing Republic
"While this America settles in the mould of its vulgarity, heavily thickening to empire"
Robinson Jeffers
   wrote   
The Women at Point Sur
Jeffers considered this long poem, among other things, a study into the origins of religion
Rudyard Kipling
   wrote   
Gunga Din
"You may talk o' gin and beer when you're quartered safe out 'ere"
Rudyard Kipling
   wrote   
If
"If you can keep your head when all about you Are losing theirs and blaming it on you …"
Rudyard Kipling
   wrote   
Mandalay
"By the old Moulmein Pagoda, lookin' eastward to the sea"
Rupert Brooke
   wrote   
The Soldier
"If I should die, think only this of me: that there's some corner of a foreign field that is forever England"
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
   wrote   
Christabel
"Tis the middle of night by the castle clock"
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
   wrote   
Kubla Khan
"In Xanadu did Kubla Khan A stately pleasure-dome decree …"
Samuel Taylor Coleridge
   wrote   
Rime of the Ancient Mariner
"It is an ancient Mariner, And he stoppeth one of three. `By thy long beard and glittering eye, Now wherefore stopp'st thou me ?"
Sara Teasdale
   wrote   
There Will Come Soft Rains
Inspired and featured in Ray Bradbury's Martian Chronicles
Sara Teasdale
   wrote   
Those Who Love
"...the most, do not talk of their love Francesca, Guinevere, Deirdre, Iseult, Heloise"
Sharon Olds
   wrote   
Bible Study: 71 B.C.E.
"After Marcus Licinius Crassus defeated the army of Spartacus, he crucified 6000 men"
Sharon Olds
   wrote   
The Connoisseuse of Slugs
"When I was a connoisseuse of slugs I would part the ivy leaves"
Sharon Olds
   wrote   
First Hour
"That hour, I was most myself. I had shrugged my mother slowly off"
Sharon Olds
   wrote   
I Go Back to May 1937
"I see them standing at the formal gates of their colleges, I see my father strolling out"
Sharon Olds
   wrote   
Miscarriage
"When I was a month pregnant, the great clots of blood appeared in the pale green swaying water of the toilet"
Sharon Olds
   wrote   
Take the I Out
"But I love the I, steel I beam that my father sold"
Sharon Olds
   wrote   
Virginal Orgy
"In our Sophomore year, Solomon Wheat, a Senior, Captain of the high school team"
Sharon Olds
   wrote   
What It Meant
"I didn't know what it meant, that he was born in the beauty of the lillies"
Shel Silverstein
   wrote   
Where the Sidewalk Ends
"There is a place where the sidewalk ends And before the street begins …"
Shinkichi Takahashi
   wrote   
Fish
"I hold a newspaper, reading. Suddenly my hands become cow ears"; trans. by Lucien Stryk
Shinkichi Takahashi
   wrote   
Sparrow in Winter
"Breastdown fluttering in the breeze, the sparrow's full of air holes"
Simon Ortiz
   wrote   
The Creation: According to Coyote
"First of all, it's all true. Coyote, he says this"
Simon Ortiz
   wrote   
The Serenity in Stones
"I am holding this turquoise in my hands. My hands hold the sky"
Stanley Kunitz
   wrote   
The Portrait
"My mother never forgave my father for killing himself, especially at such an awkward time"
Sylvia Plath
   wrote   
Frog Autumn
"Summer grows old, cold-blooded mother, The insects are scant, skinny …"
Sylvia Plath
   wrote   
Morning Song
"Love set you going like a fat gold watch.
Ted Hughes
   wrote   
Bride and Groom Lie Hidden for Three Days
"She gives him his eyes...."
Ted Hughes
   wrote   
Crow's Fall
"When Crow was white he decided the sun was too white...."
Ted Hughes
   wrote   
Relic
"I found this jawbone at the sea's edge:...."
Ted Kooser
   wrote   
Old Cemetery
Somebody has been here today to cut the grass, coming and going unseen"
Ted Kooser
   wrote   
Tectonics
"In only a few months there begin to be fissures in what we remember"
Tess Gallagher
   wrote   
I Stop Writing the Poem
"to fold the clothes. No matter who lives or who dies, I'm still a woman"
Theodore Enslin
   wrote   
Forms
Four-volume long poem
Theodore Roethke
   wrote   
The Far Field
"I dream of journeys repeatedly: Of flying like a bat deep into a narrowing tunnel"
Thomas Gray
   wrote   
Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard
"The Curfew tolls the knell of parting day, The lowing herd winds slowly o'er the lea …"
Thomas Merton
   wrote   
There Has to Be a Jail for Ladies
"...when they are poor, without nice things, and with their hair down"
Thomas Moore
   wrote   
Venetian Air
"Row gently here, my gondolier, so softly wake the tide, that not an ear on earth may hear, but hers to whom we glide"
Tomas Tranströmer
   wrote   
Schubertiana
"Outside New York, a high place where with one glance"; trans. by Robert Bly
Tom Clark
   wrote   
The Great One
"So long Roberto Clemente, you have joined the immortals"
Tom Clark
   wrote   
To Clemente in September
"Watching the season die on television makes me think of you, Roberto, in the end"
T. S. Eliot
   wrote   
The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock
"Let us go then, you and I, when the evening is spread out against the sky"
T. S. Eliot
   wrote   
The Waste Land
"April is the cruellest month, breeding lilacs out of the dead land, mixing memory and desire"
Vachel Lindsay
   wrote   
Abraham Lincoln Walks at Midnight
"It is portentous, and a thing of state"
Vachel Lindsay
   wrote   
General William Booth Enters Into Heaven
Music to this poem composed by Charles Ives
Victor Hugo
   wrote   
The Art of Being a Grandfather"
Long poem describing the feeling of a grandfather entrusted with the care of young children
Victor Hugo
   wrote   
Boaz Asleep
"Boaz, overcome with weariness, by torchlight made his pallet on the threshing floor"
Wallace Stevens
   wrote   
A High-Toned Old Christian Woman
"Poetry is the supreme fiction, madame...."
Wallace Stevens
   wrote   
On the Road Home
"It was when I said, 'There is no such thing as the truth,' that the grapes seemed fatter."
Wallace Stevens
   wrote   
A Postcard from the Volcano
"Children picking up our bones will never know...."
Wallace Stevens
   wrote   
The Snow Man
"One must have a mind of winter to regard the frost and the boughs of the pine trees crusted with snow"
Wallace Stevens
   wrote   
Study of Two Pears
"Opusculum paedagogum. The pears are not viols, nudes or bottles"
Wallace Stevens
   wrote   
Thirteen Ways of Looking at a Blackbird
"Among twenty snowy mountains, the only moving thing was the eye...."
Walter De La Mare
   wrote   
The Listeners
"Is there anybody there?' said the Traveller, Knocking on the moonlit door …"
Walt Whitman
   wrote   
Beat! Beat! Drums!
"Beat! beat! drums!—Blow! bugles! blow! Through the windows—through doors—burst like a ruthless force …"
Walt Whitman
   wrote   
Come Up From the Fields Father
"...here's a letter from our Pete, and come to the front door mother, here's a letter from thy dear son"
Walt Whitman
   wrote   
O Captain, My Captain
"O Captain my Captain! our fearful trip is done, The ship has weathered every rack, the prize we sought is won …"
Walt Whitman
   wrote   
Song of Myself
His singular long poem
Walt Whitman
   wrote   
When I Heard at the Close of Day
"...how many names had been receiv'd with plaudits in the capitol"
Walt Whitman
   wrote   
When I Heard the Learn'd Astronomer
"When the proofs, the figures, were ranged in columns before me"
Walt Whitman
   wrote   
When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd
"...And the great star early droop'd in the western sky in the night"
W. D. Snodgrass
   wrote   
Autumn Scene
"In the public gardens they are walking. The skies appear correct and glum"
W. D. Snodgrass
   wrote   
The First Leaf
"The train pulls down the track. We go about our business; I have turned my back"
W. D. Snodgrass
   wrote   
Powwow
"They all dance with their eyes turned inward- like a woman nursing a sick child she already knows will die"
W. D. Snodgrass
   wrote   
September
"The newts in the creek had gone already. I don't know where. I can't remember your face or anything you said"
Wendell Berry
   wrote   
Her First Calf
"Her fate seizes her and brings her down. She is heavy with it"
Wendell Berry
   wrote   
Manifesto: The Mad Farmer Liberation Front
"Love the quick profit, the annual raise, vacation with pay"
Wendell Berry
   wrote   
The Peace of Wild Things
"When despair for the world grows in me and I wake in the night"
W. H. Auden
   wrote   
Address to the Beasts
"If you cannot engender a genius like Mozart, neither can you plague the earth with brilliant sillies like Hegel or clever nasties like Hobbes"
W. H. Auden
   wrote   
Archaeology
"There's nothing the Crucified would like less than butchery to appease him"
W. H. Auden
   wrote   
At Last the Secret is Out
"...as it always must come in the end, the delicious story is ripe to tell"
W. H. Auden
   wrote   
Aubade
"Time, the domain of Deeds, calls for a complex Grammar with many Moods and Tenses"
W. H. Auden
   wrote   
Funeral Blues
" Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone ..." Read by Matthew (John Hannah) at the funeral of his partner Gareth (Simon Callow) in the film 'Four Weddings and a Funeral'.
W. H. Auden
   wrote   
No, Plato, No
"I can't imagine anything that I would like less to be than a disincarnate Spirit"
W. H. Auden
   wrote   
Ode to the Medieval Poets
"Chaucer, Langland, Douglas, Dunbar, with all your brother Anons, how on earth did you ever manage"
W. H. Auden
   wrote   
Thank You, Fog
"Grown used to New York weather, all too familiar with Smog"
Wilfred Owen
   wrote   
Dulce Et Decorum Est
"Bent double, like old beggars under sacks"
Wilfred Owen
   wrote   
Greater Love
"Weep, you may weep, for you may touch them not"
William Blake
   wrote   
Holy Thursday
" 'Twas on a Holy Thursday, their innocent faces clean, the children walking two and two, in red & blue & green"
William Blake
   wrote   
Jerusalem
"And did those feet in ancient time Walk upon England's mountains green?"
William Blake
   wrote   
The Lamb
"Little lamb, who made thee? Dost thou know who made thee...."
William Blake
   wrote   
The Tyger
"Tyger! Tyger! burning bright In the forests of the night, What immortal hand or eye Could frame thy fearful symmetry?"
William Butler Yeats
   wrote   
Byzantium
"That is no country for old men. The young In one another's arms, birds in the trees …"
William Butler Yeats
   wrote   
An Irish Airman Foresees His Death
"I know that I shall meet my fate Somewhere among the clouds above …"
William Butler Yeats
   wrote   
Politics
"How can I, that girl standing there, my attention fix on Roman or on Russian or on Spanish politics"
William Carlos Williams
   wrote   
The Last Words of My English Grandmother
"There were some dirty plates and a glass of milk beside her on a small table near the rank, dishevelled bed …"
William Carlos Williams
   wrote   
Paterson
"Before the grass is out the people are out and and bare twigs still whip the wind"
William Carlos Williams
   wrote   
Spring and All
Long poem, 1923; "By the road to the contagious hospital"
William Carlos Williams
   wrote   
This Is Just To Say
"...I have eaten the plums that were in the icebox"
William Carlos Williams
   wrote   
Tract
"I will teach you my townspeople how to perform a funeral"
William Carlos Williams
   wrote   
The Widow's Lament in Springtime
"Masses of flowers load the cherry branches and color some bushes yellow and some red"
William Cullen Bryant
   wrote   
Thanatopsis
"To him who, in the love of Nature, holds Communion with her visible forms"
William Everson
   wrote   
A Canticle to the Waterbirds
"Clack your beaks you cormorants and kittiwakes, north on those rock croppings"
William Everson
   wrote   
The Conversion of Saint Paul
"Jerusalem died in the dust. They took the short route,"
William Everson
   wrote   
First Winter Storm
"All day long the clouds formed in the peaks"
William Everson
   wrote   
Winter Ploughing
"Before my feet the plowshare rolls the earth"
William Shakespeare
   wrote   
All the World's a Stage
"and all the men and women merely players"
William Shakespeare
   wrote   
A Lover's Complaint
"From off a hill whose concave womb reworded"
William Shakespeare
   wrote   
Shall I Compare Thee to a Summers Day?
(Sonnet no.18) "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate …"
William Shakespeare
   wrote   
Thou Winter Wind
"Blow, blow, thou winter wind, thou art so unkind as man's ingratitude"
William Stafford
   wrote   
A Ritual to Read to Each Other
"the signals we give-yes or no, or maybe-should be clear: the darkness around us is deep"
William Stafford
   wrote   
Sayings From the Northern Ice
"It is people at the edge who say things at the edge"
William Stafford
   wrote   
Ultimate Problems
"In the Aztec design God crowds into the little pea that is rolling out of the picture"
William Stafford
   wrote   
Ways to Live
"In India in their lives they happen again and again, being people or animals"
William Wordsworth
   wrote   
I Wandered Lonely As a Cloud (The Daffodils)
"I wandered lonely as a cloud That floats on high o'er vales and hills …"
William Wordsworth
   wrote   
Lucy
"She dwelt among the untrodden ways, Beside the springs of Dove"
William Wordsworth
   wrote   
My Heart Leaps Up When I Behold
"...a rainbow in the sky"
William Wordsworth
   wrote   
Upon Westminister Bridge
"Earth has not anything to show more fair: Dull would he be of soul who could pass by …"
William Wordsworth
   wrote   
The World is Too Much With Us
"late and soon, getting and spending, we lay waste our powers"
Wislawa Szymborska
   wrote   
A Great Man's House
"He partook of life as if it were reusable"
Wislawa Szymborska
   wrote   
Under a Certain Little Star
"My apologies to chance for calling it necessity
W. S. Merwin
   wrote   
Another River
"far up the valley of that river into whose estuary the man from England sailed"
W. S. Merwin
   wrote   
The Chinese Mountain Fox
"there once must have been a time when it was always there"
W. S. Merwin
   wrote   
For the Anniversary of My Death
"Every year without knowing it I have passed the day when the last fires will wave to me"
W. S. Merwin
   wrote   
The Gardens of Versailles
"there was nothing before this except defects of Nature and a waste of marshes"
W. S. Merwin
   wrote   
Rain Travel
Poetry "I wake in the dark and remember it is the morning when I must start by myself on the journey"
W. S. Merwin
   wrote   
Suite in the Key of Forgetting
Long poem beginning "You remember surely is the way it begins in a time after words"
W. S. Merwin
   wrote   
Yesterday
Poetry "My friend says I was not a good son you understand I say yes I understand"


Facts contributed by:


Doctor Factenstein








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