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International Rugby Hall of Fame

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The International Rugby Hall of Fame is a hall of fame for rugby union. It was created in 1997 in New Zealand and is run as a charitable trust. Most of the trustees are also inductees. IRHOF accepts new inductees every two years. Most inductees are former players, but others who have contributed to the game are eligible. Non-playing inductees are: Bill McLaren (commentator) and Terry McLean (journalist).

64 facts:

Andre Boniface
   represented   
France
Inducted 2005. His usual position was either on the wing or in the centres. His Test career for France, 1954 through to 1966, included 48 caps and 44 points.
Andy Irvine
   represented   
Scotland
Inducted 1999. As fullback for Scotland, he won 51 caps, 1972-82. He also earned British Lions caps versus South Africa (1974), New Zealand (1977) and South Africa (1980). He also played for the BaaBaa's (Barbarian F.C.) during their 1976 Easter Tour.
Barry John
   represented   
Wales
Inducted 1997. Fly-half. He is considered by many to be the greatest fly-half in the sport's history, and became known as "the King". At the age of only 27, with only 25 Welsh caps and 5 British Lions caps, Barry John retired from the game.
Bennie Osler
   represented   
South Africa
Inducted 2007. Fly-half. Osler's Springboks became the second South African team, and only second of all time, to win a Grand Slam—a win over all four Home Nations on one tour. 17 caps.
Bill Beaumont
   represented   
England
Inducted 2003. was captain of the England rugby union team at a time when they struggled to win games. His greatest moment as captain was the unexpected 1980 Grand Slam. He played as a lock. He won 34 caps for England, then a record for a lock, and was captain 21 times.
Brian Lochore
   represented   
New Zealand
Inducted 1999. represented and captained the New Zealand national team, the All Blacks. He played at number 8 and lock, as well as captaining the side 46 times (18 of those tests).
Carwyn James
   represented   
Wales
Inducted 1999. He won two Welsh international caps but is most famous for his coaching achievements for both Llanelli and the British and Irish Lions.
Cliff Morgan
   represented   
Wales
Inducted 1997. played for Cardiff RFC and earned 29 caps for Wales between 1951 and 1958.
Colin Meads
   represented   
New Zealand
Inducted 1997. He was first selected for the Under 21 National side in 1955 and was selected for the National side tour of Australia the following year. He was a very flexible player and although a lock, he was comfortable at flanker, number eight and even on the wing. He was nicknamed the ‘Pinetree’ as he was 6’4’’ tall and 16 stone and he went on to play 133 games for the All Blacks between 1957 and 1971 and scored 27 tries.
Danie Craven
   represented   
South Africa
Inducted 1997. A former Western Province, Eastern Province, Northern Transvaal and Springbok rugby union player as well as arguably South Africa's best and best-known rugby administrator. He also coached the Springboks between 1949 and 1956, becoming one of the most successful Springbok coaches of all time. In 2007 he became the 3rd inductee into the IRB Hall of Fame.
Danie Gerber
   represented   
South Africa
Inducted 2007. Made only 24 caps for South Africa despite playing internationally for 12 years because of South Africa's sporting isolation caused by apartheid.
David Campese
   represented   
Australia
Inducted 2001. David Ian Campese or ‘Campo’ was Australia’s greatest ever winger and one of the world’s finest backs. At age 19 he was selected as full back for the Australian Under 21 side. In total he went on to win 101 caps for the Wallabies and scored a record 64 tries. He was instrumental in Australia’s World Cup victory in 1991 and is famous for introducing the ‘goose-step’ to the modern game.
David Gallaher
   represented   
New Zealand
Inducted 2005. Made his debut for the All Blacks in July 1903. In total he played 6 Tests, 4 as captain and another 36 matches (27 as captain) with the All Blacks and only lost one match. He will be remembered for captaining the All Black ‘Originals’, the first ever All Black side. They played 36 games in Britain, Ireland, France and Canada and remarkably won 35, lost 1 and scored 1022 points whilst only conceding 72. Gallaher was tragically killed during the War.
Don Clarke
   represented   
New Zealand
Inducted 2001. played 89 times (31 of these were test matches) as an All Black from 1956 until 1964. He was best known for his phenomenal goal kicking ability that earned him the nickname "The Boot". Over his entire All Black career Clarke scored 781 points, a record that stood for 24 years until it was broken by Grant Fox in 1988.
Fergus Slattery
   represented   
Ireland
Inducted 2007. During his career Slattery earned 61 caps, 18 as captain, and scored 3 tries. In 1971 he was a member of the British and Irish Lions squad that toured New Zealand, but did not play in the test matches. Slattery toured again in 1974, playing in all four tests and captaining the side for two provincial matches. He was captain of the most successful Irish touring side ever in 1979
Francois Pienaar
   represented   
South Africa
2005. Captained and played flanker for the South African Springboks national rugby union team from 26 June 1993 until 10 August 1996. He won 29 test caps and led the Springboks to victory in the 1995 Rugby Union World Cup.
Fred Allen
   represented   
New Zealand
Inducted 2005. Selected for the All Blacks in 1946. He continued to play for the All Blacks, and in 1949 was selected as captain for the 1949 tour to South Africa. Allen retired from playing after the series. He went on to coach, and was a selector-coach for Auckland during their Ranfurly Shield era of the late 1950s. He was eventually an All Blacks selector before becoming All Blacks coach in 1966. The All Blacks reign under Allen was the team's most successful; they won all 14 of their Tests with him as coach.
Frik Du Preez
   represented   
South Africa
Inducted 1997.Northern Transvaal and Springboks Rugby union player. Du Preez mostly played in the flank or lock positions. Du Preez played his first test for the Boks on 7 January 1961 at the age of 25 in the flank position against England. He played his last test on 7 August 1971 at the age of 35. 38 caps.
Gareth Edwards
   represented   
Wales
Inducted 1997. Widely recognised as the best scrum-half to have ever played the game. He won his first of 53 caps for Wales in 1967 and played in the great Welsh rugby side of the 1970’s. His first cap came against France at the age of 19 and he went on to become Wales’s youngest ever captain the following year.
Gavin Hastings
   represented   
Scotland
Inducted 2003. 61 caps for Scotland, 20 of which as captain. He played fullback, and captained the Lions on the tour to New Zealand in 1993. Until his record was overtaken by Chris Paterson on 7 June 2008, Hastings was the all-time record points scorer in the Scottish national rugby union team, with 667 points in test matches. He remains the all-time record points scorer for the British and Irish Lions (in test matches) with 66
George Nepia
   represented   
New Zealand
Inducted 1997. a Māori rugby union and rugby league player. He is remembered as an exceptional full-back and one of the most famous Māori rugby players. He was inducted into the New Zealand Sports Hall of Fame in 1990. 46 caps for the All-Blacks.
Gerald Davies
   represented   
Wales
Inducted 1999. Became arguably one of the greatest wingers of all time whilst playing for Wales between 1966 and 1978. He made his international debut against Australia in Cardiff in 1966 and played for Wales for 12 years. During those years, Davies had 46 caps and scored 20 tries. He was an important member of the legendary Lions tours in 1968 and 1971.
Gordon Brown
   represented   
Scotland
Inducted 2001. He won the first of 30 caps as a lock for Scotland at the tender age of 22.
Graham Mourie
   represented   
New Zealand
Inducted 2007. All Black flanker and coach of the Hurricanes. He played a total of 61 matches (57 as captain) for the All Blacks until 1982. He captained the All Blacks on their historic Grand Slam tour of Britain and Ireland in 1978. In 1981, Mourie made himself unavailable for selection during the controversial tour of New Zealand by the Springboks. He returned as captain later that year for the tour of Romania and France.
Grant Fox
   represented   
New Zealand
Inducted 2005. During his time with the All Blacks from 1985 to 1993, he wore the number 10 jersey (first five-eighth or fly-half), and was the main goalkicker for the All Blacks. He amassed 645 points from 46 All Black Test Matches (1 try, 118 conversions, 128 penalties, 7 drop goals).
Gwyn Nicholls
   represented   
Wales
Inducted 2005. Gained 24 caps for Wales as a centre. Nicholls was known as the "Prince of Threequarters"
Hennie Muller
   represented   
South Africa
Inducted 2001. Muller is considered one of the greatest South African footballers, captaining the national side, the Springboks in nine tests. His usual position was at number eight.
Hugo Porta
   represented   
Argentina
Inducted 1997. An inductee of both the International Rugby Hall of Fame and IRB Hall of Fame, and arguably the best fly-half the sport has seen.During the 1970s and 1980s, he played 58 times for Los Pumas, captaining them on 34 occasions, including leading them during their first World Cup in 1987.
Ieuan Evans
   represented   
Wales
Inducted 2007. Played on the wing for Wales. He is regarded as one of the best Welsh wingers of all time, despite playing through a disappointing era of Welsh rugby. A prolific try scorer at International level, Evans is listed 16th in the world on the all-time Test try scoring list. He won 72 caps for Wales, 28 of them as captain, and scored 33 tries - at that time a record for Wales.
Ian Kirkpatrick
   represented   
New Zealand
Inducted 2003. Kirkpatrick would appear for the All Blacks in 39 International Tests (9 as captain) scoring 16 tries which would remain a national record until Stu Wilson surpassed this total in 1983.
Ian McGeechan
   represented   
Scotland
Inducted 2005. Made his debut for Scotland in 1972. He won thirty-two caps, playing at fly-half and centre. He captained Scotland on nine occasions. He toured with the British and Irish Lions in both 1974 and 1977.
Jack Kyle
   represented   
Ireland
Inducted 1999. Played for Ireland, the British Lions and the Barbarians during the 1940s and 1950s. In 2002 he was named the Greatest Ever Irish Rugby Player by the Irish Rugby Football Union,
Jason Leonard
   represented   
England
Inducted 2007. Prop. Held the world record for winning the most international caps until 2005. He also held the record for total international appearances when his five caps with the British and Irish Lions were included until 2006. Leonard has 119 caps (114 for England). Leonard's record as the world's most-capped forward still stands. As an England player, Leonard won the highest international accolades possible: Grand Slams(1991, 1992, 1995 and 2003) and the 2003 Rugby World Cup. He also won a British and Irish Lions Test series (on the 1997 tour of South Africa).
Jean-Pierre Rives
   represented   
France
Inducted 1997. Had amazing agility which gained France some amazing results in the 1970s and 1980s. Won 59 caps for France as a flanker.
Jean Prat
   represented   
France
Inducted 2001. A flanker. He played over 50 times for France.
John Eales
   represented   
Australia
Inducted 2005. Eales 55-cap reign as captain marked an era of Australian success in world rugby. Eales played a major part in Australia’s victories at the Rugby World Cup twice in his illustrious career as a lock, first in 1991, and later skippering his country to victory in 1999. He was nicknamed Nobody because 'Nobody's perfect'.
John Kirwan
   represented   
New Zealand
Inducted 2003. Kirwan, who played at wing, played 96 times (including 63 test matches) as an All Black from 1984 until 1994.
Jo Maso
   represented   
France
Inducted 2003. Played centre for France, gaining 25 caps. His alternative position was fly-half. He is now the manager for the French national team
Jonah Lomu
   represented   
New Zealand
Inducted 2007. Wing. He had sixty-three caps as an All Black after debuting in 1994. He is generally regarded as the first true global superstar of rugby union. He is officially the Rugby World Cup all-time top try scorer with 15 tries.
Joost Van Der Westhuizen
   represented   
South Africa
Inducted 2007. The Springboks' first choice scrum-half in the mid-to-late 1990s and early 2000s. He was capped 89 times for the Springboks and scored 38 tries. He retired as the most capped Springbok of all time, and still holds the record for the most test tries by a South African player. His career test try tally of 38 makes him the scrum-half with the most tries in Test Rugby.
JPR Williams
   represented   
Wales
Inducted 1997. Earned 55 caps for Wales and 8 for the British Lions. He played club rugby for Bridgend and London Welsh. Had the ability to swerve and evade tackles.
Keith Wood
   represented   
Ireland
Inducted 2005. He played on the 1997 and 2001 Lions tours, and was the inaugural winner of the IRB World Player of the Year award in 2001. He played a major part in the Lions' 2-1 series victory over the Springboks in 1997. Wood captained Ireland, he currently holds a world record of 15 full international test tries scored by a hooker.
Ken Catchpole
   represented   
Australia
Inducted 2001. He played 27 matches for Australia, 13 as captain. He is considered one of the game's greatest scrumhalves.
Mark Ella
   represented   
Australia
Inducted 1997. Fly-half / first five-eighth. Often considered as one of his country's all-time greats in that sport. In a relatively short career (he retired in 1984, aged only 25), Mark Ella established himself as one of the all-time greats in world rugby union.
Martin Johnson
   represented   
England
Inducted 2005. He is mostly known for captaining England to victory in the World Cup in 2003. He became the new England team manager in 2008. He's regarded as one of the greatest locks to have ever played. He toured three times with the British and Irish Lions, becoming the only man to have captained them on two separate tours. 84 caps for England.
Mervyn Davies
   represented   
Wales
Inducted 2001. He won his first cap for Wales in 1969 against Scotland, going on to play 38 consecutive matches for Wales and scoring two tries. During this period Wales won two Grand Slams and three Triple Crowns. He went on the British and Irish Lions tours to New Zealand in 1971 and to South Africa in 1974, playing in eight tests. In a total of 46 international appearances for Wales and the Lions he only ended on the losing side nine times.
Michael Jones
   represented   
New Zealand
Inducted 2003. 55 caps for NZ. His international career was also affected by his strong Christian beliefs, as he refused to play on Sundays. Although selected for the 1987 and 1991 All Black World Cup squads, he missed 3 Sunday games in the 1991 tournament because of this refusal. Jones was then omitted from the 1995 squad as he would have been unavailable for the quarterfinal and semifinal games. He was nicknamed 'the Iceman' or 'Ice' because of the cool but confident manner in which he played, and the number of icepacks he needed for injuries.
Michael Jones
   represented   
Western Samoa
Inducted 2003. Although born in New Zealand he first played internationally for Manu Samoa for whom he qualified through one of his parents before going on to represent New Zealand. Player as flanker.
Michael Lynagh
   represented   
Australia
Inducted 2001. Represented Australia from 1984 to 1995, playing at both inside centre and fly half. Lynagh was capped 72 times for Australia, and was captain from 1993 to 1995. He was the world points scoring record holder when he retired, with 911 points. Michael was a member of the 1984 Grand Slam winning team and was vice-captain when Australia won the 1991 Rugby World Cup. Until he handed the kicking duties over to Marty Roebuck, he scored in every test he played in
Mike Gibson
   represented   
Ireland
Inducted 1997. He first played for Ireland in 1964, and earned his 69th and final cap in the second and final test win against Australia in Sydney in 1979 at age 36. A versatile player, he represented his country at four different positions. Gibson had a distinguished international career, His all round talent marked him out as arguably the greatest centre of any era.
Morne Du Plessis
   represented   
South Africa
Inducted 1999. He is often described as one of the Springboks' most successful captains. Playing at number 8, his national career spanned ten years, five of which he was captain. He was also the manager of the 1995 Springboks which won the famous 1995 Rugby World Cup final. In total he played 22 times for South Africa, winning 18 times. Under his captaincy the Springboks won thirteen times, and lost only twice.
Naas Botha
   represented   
South Africa
Inducted 2005. Botha remained the highest points scorer in Springbok rugby history for a number of years, with a points total of 312, until 17 July 2004, when his tally was passed by Percy Montgomery. However, Montgomery had to play in many more matches to achieve this feat, while Botha had only played in 28. Botha mostly played in the fly-half position and is now a rugby commentator for the South African M-Net and Supersport TV channels.
Nick Farr Jones
   represented   
Australia
Inducted 1999. He made his international debut for the Wallabies on 3 November 1984 v England at Twickenham. He played in the inaugural Rugby World Cup in 1987 and a year later was named Australian captain. In 1991, he guided Australia to victory in 1991 Rugby World Cup. Farr-Jones was capped 63 times for Australia, including 36 as captain, and scored nine tries. During his career, he formed a world record half-back combination with Michael Lynagh of 47 Tests together.
Phil Bennett
   represented   
Wales
Inducted 2005. Made his debut in 1969 against France at the age of 20 when he became the first ever Welsh substitute in international rugby, replacing an injured Gerald Davies. Initially, Phil played in a number of positions including fullback and centre, but settled in the fly-half position. Bennett retired from international rugby union in 1978, having won a total of 29 caps.
Philippe Sella
   represented   
France
Inducted 1999. Sella made a world record 111 appearances (or caps) for France, a record only beaten by a few players.
Sean Fitzpatrick
   represented   
New Zealand
Inducted 2001. Sean Brian Thomas Fitzpatrick or ‘Fitzy’ played 92 times for his country as hooker. He was made captain of the All Blacks in 1992 and kept the honour until his retirement.
Serge Blanco
   represented   
France
Inducted 1997. First represented France against South Africa in 1980. He went on to win 93 caps for France including two Five Nations Championships Grand Slams. He famously instigated a try from behind the French own try line against England at Twickenham in 1991.
Syd Millar
   represented   
Ireland
Inducted 2003. Represented Ireland in the pack, winning 37 caps as a prop. In addition, he played 9 times for the British and Irish Lions.
Tim Horan
   represented   
Australia
Inducted 2003. Represented Australia, he was one of the best centres in the world throughout the 1990s. 80 caps.
Tom Kiernan
   represented   
Ireland
Inducted 2007. He won 54 caps for Ireland as a full-back between 1960 and 1973 and captained his country 24 times. At the time of his retirement he was Ireland's most-capped player, most experienced captain and record scorer in international with 158 points. He captained the 1968 British Lions tour to South Africa, playing in all four internationals against South Africa.
Tony O'Reilly
   represented   
Ireland
Inducted 1997. As a rugby player he represented Ireland, the British Lions and the Barbarians. Between 1955 and 1970 O'Reilly won 29 caps for Ireland. His total of 37 tries for the Lions on two tours remains a record. Between 1955 and 1963 O’Reilly also made 30 appearances and scored 38 tries for the Barbarians. He remains the Barbarians record holder for both appearances and tries.
Wavell Wakefield
   represented   
England
Inducted 1999. He made his England debut against Wales in 1920 and went onto to gain 31 caps (13 as captain).
Willie John McBride
   represented   
Ireland
Inducted 1997. Played as a lock for Ireland and the British and Irish Lions. He played 63 Tests for Ireland including eleven as captain, and toured with the Lions five times — a record that gave him 17 Lions Test caps. He also captained the most successful ever Lions side which toured South Africa in 1974.
Wilson Whineray
   represented   
New Zealand
Inducted 1999. Another All Black legend who played over 30 Tests. He played for the All Blacks between 1957 and 1965. He was the team's longest serving captain.


Facts contributed by:


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