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General works of fiction. New additions should be best-sellers, award-winners or otherwise significant with no more than six books per author.
Also see other Fiction subjects e.g. Fiction - Mystery, Crime and Thrillers, Fiction - Romance, Fiction - Science Fiction and Fantasy and the various Non-Fiction subjects.

1339 facts:

A. B. Guthrie Jr.
   wrote   
The Big Sky
1947. The first of A. B. Guthrie, Jr.'s, epic adventure novels of America's vast frontier. Guthrie wrote the Academy Award-nominated script to the landmark film Shane
A. B. Guthrie Jr.
   wrote   
The Way West
1949. Won Pulitzer prize
Aeschylus
   wrote   
The Oresteia
A trilogy of Greek tragedies about the end of the curse on the House of Atreus. Though originally written as tetralogy, the fourth play, Proteus, a satyr play that would have been performed as finale, has not survived. The Oresteia was originally performed at the Dionysia festival in Athens in 458 BC, where it won first prize.
Aesopus
   wrote   
Aesop’s Fables
Aesop (620–560 BC), was a slave and story-teller who lived in Ancient Greece. His fables are some of the most well known in the world. The fables remain a popular choice for moral education of children today.
Akhil Sharma
   wrote   
An Obedient Father
Won the 2000 PEN/Hemingway Award and the 2001 Whiting Writers' Award.
Alain Robbe-Grillet
   wrote   
The Voyeur
1955. First published in French as 'Le Voyeur'.
Alasdair Gray
   wrote   
Lanark
1981. Subtitled "A Life in Four Books", the Scottish writer's first novel is now regarded as a classic, and was described by The Guardian as "one of the landmarks of 20th-century fiction."
Alan Bennett
   wrote   
The Uncommon Reader
2007. A novella.
Albert Camus
   wrote   
The Fall
1956. 'La Chute'
Albert Camus
   wrote   
A Happy Death
'La Mort heureuse' Written 1936-1938, published posthumously 1971
Albert Camus
   wrote   
The Plague
1947. 'La Peste'. An existentialist classic about suffering
Albert Camus
   wrote   
The Stranger
1942. 'L'Étranger', often translated as 'The Outsider'
Albert Cohen
   wrote   
Belle Du Seigneur
1968. Grand Prix du Roman de l'Académie Française
Alberto Moravia
   wrote   
Il Conformista
1947. Anti-fascist novel which was the basis for the film 'The Conformist'
Alberto Moravia
   wrote   
I Racconti
Won the Strega Prize (Premio Strega)
Alberto Moravia
   wrote   
La Romana
1947 'The Woman of Rome'
Aldous Huxley
   wrote   
After Many a Summer Dies the Swan
1939. This satire explores several philosophical and social issues, some of which would later take the forefront in his final novel Island. The title is taken from the Lord Tennyson poem Tithonus about a figure from Greek mythology to whom Aurora, the goddess of dawn, gave eternal life but not eternal youth. The book was awarded the 1939 James Tait Black Memorial Prize for fiction.
Aldous Huxley
   wrote   
Antic Hay
1923. A comic novel. The story takes place in London, and depicts the aimless or self-absorbed cultural elite in the sad and turbulent times following the end of World War I.
Aldous Huxley
   wrote   
Crome Yellow
1921. Crome Yellow is the first novel by Huxley. Huxley satirises the fads and fashions of the time.
Aldous Huxley
   wrote   
Eyeless in Gaza
1936. The chapters of the novel are not ordered chronologically.
Aldous Huxley
   wrote   
Point Counter Point
1928. Huxley's fourth novel. It is highly regarded: the Modern Library lists it in the top 100 novels of the 20th C.
Alejo Carpentier
   wrote   
Kingdom of This World
A novel of the Haitian Revolution, in which he describes his vision of "lo real maravilloso" ("But what is the history of Latin America but a chronicle of magical realism?").
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
   wrote   
Cancer Ward
1967. Semi-autobiographical novel by Russian author Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, banned in the Soviet Union in 1968
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
   wrote   
The First Circle
1968. The novel details the life of the occupants of a gulag prison camp located in the Moscow suburbs, the Marfino sharashka. Many of the prisoners (zeks) are technicians or academics who have been arrested under Article 58 of the RSFSR Penal Code in Stalin's purges following the Second World War.
Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
   wrote   
One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich
1962. One of the most chilling novels about the oppression of totalitarian regimes and the first to open Western eyes to the terrors of Stalin's prison camps; if Solzhenitsyn later became Russia's conscience in exile, this is the book with which he first challenged the brutal might of the Soviet Union.
Alessandro Baricco
   wrote   
Silk
Alessandro Manzoni
   wrote   
The Betrothed
1827. An Italian historical novel. It has been called the most famous and widely read novel of the Italian language.
Alexandre Dumas
   wrote   
The Count of Monte Cristo
1844 - 1886. An adventure story of justice, vengeance, mercy, and forgiveness based on a true story. It is often considered to be, along with The Three Musketeers, Dumas' most popular work. It is also among the highest selling books of all time.
Alexandre Dumas
   wrote   
La Reine Margot
Alexandre Dumas
   wrote   
The Three Musketeers
1844
Alfred Döblin
   wrote   
Berlin Alexanderplatz
In a 2002 poll of 100 noted writers conducted by the Norwegian Book Clubs, the book was named among the top 100 books of all time.
Alan Garner
   wrote   
Thursbitch
Named after the valley in the Pennines of England where the action occurs
Alan Hollinghurst
   wrote   
The Folding Star
Won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for fiction in 1994. It was also shortlisted for the Booker Prize.
Alan Hollinghurst
   wrote   
The Swimming-Pool Library
Won the Somerset Maugham Award in 1989.
Alice Sebold
   wrote   
The Almost Moon
2007. The book is set in a single day
Alice Sebold
   wrote   
The Lovely Bones
2002. Sold over a million and remained on the New York Times hardback bestseller list for over a year.
Alice Walker
   wrote   
The Color Purple
Pulitizer Prize and National Book Award, 1983
Alice Walker
   wrote   
Meridian
Alice Walker
   wrote   
Possessing the Secret of Joy
A. L. Kennedy
   wrote   
Day
Costa Book of the Year Award 2007
A. L. Kennedy
   wrote   
Looking for the Possible Dance
Allen Drury
   wrote   
Advise and Consent
Pulitizer Prize, 1960; died on his 80th birthday
Alan Paton
   wrote   
Cry, the Beloved Country
A social protest against the structures of the society that would later give rise to apartheid. Cry, The Beloved Country was written before the implementation of the apartheid political system in South Africa. The novel was published in 1948, with apartheid becoming law later on that same year.
Alan Sillitoe
   wrote   
Saturday Night and Sunday Morning
Alan Warner
   wrote   
Morvern Callar
Winner of the Somerset Maugham Award in 1996
Amélie Nothomb
   wrote   
Fear and Trembling
1999. Awarded the Grand Prix du roman de l'Académie française 1999
Amos Tutuola
   wrote   
My Life in the Bush of Ghosts
1954; Nigerian writer, 1920-1997
Amos Tutuola
   wrote   
Palm-Wine Drinkard
"and His Dead Palm-Wine Tapster in the Dead's Town"
Amy Tan
   wrote   
The Joy Luck Club
1990. Bestseller
Amy Tan
   wrote   
The Kitchen God's Wife
1991
Amy Tan
   wrote   
Saving Fish From Drowning
2005. Multi-layered morality tale by the same author as The Joy Luck Club
André Breton
   wrote   
Arcane 17
A lyrical prophecy of a veritable emancipation of Woman, an affirmation of Breton's belief in youth and a championing of the three great causes of poetry, love, and liberty.
André Breton
   wrote   
Nadja
Starts with the question "Who am I?"
André Gide
   wrote   
The Counterfeiters
1927. 'Les faux-monnayeurs'. Its main theme is that of the original and the copy, and what differentiates them – both in the external plot of the counterfeit gold coins and in the portrayal of the characters' feelings and their relationships.
André Gide
   wrote   
The Immoralist
'L'immoraliste'.
André Gide
   wrote   
Lafcadio's Adventures
1914. 'The Vatican Swindle'. Aka. 'Les caves du Vatican'. A humorous satire on bourgeois complacency, be it orthodox or anticlerical, and on relativism and chance.
André Gide
   wrote   
Strait is the Gate
'La Porte Étroite'. Probes some of the complexities and terrors of adolescence and growing up.
André Malraux
   wrote   
Man's Fate
1933; 'La Condition Humaine'. A novel about the failed communist revolution that took place in Shanghai in 1927, and the existential quandaries facing a diverse group of people associated with the revolution
Angela Carter
   wrote   
Nights at the Circus
Winner of the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for fiction
Angela Carter
   wrote   
The Passion of New Eve
A magic realist post-feminist novel, in which the female characters dominate the males.
Angela Carter
   wrote   
Wise Children
The fortunes of two chorus girls and their bizarre theatrical family
Anne Brontë
   wrote   
Agnes Grey
A literary classic. Anne's two novels, written in a sharp and ironic style, are completely different from the romanticism followed by her sisters.
Anne Brontë
   wrote   
The Tenant of Wildfell Hall
Anne used the pen name Acton Bell.
Anne Rice
   wrote   
Interview With the Vampire
Anthony Burgess
   wrote   
1985
Inspired by, and was intended as a tribute to, George Orwell's novel Nineteen Eighty-Four.
Anthony Burgess
   wrote   
A Clockwork Orange
2008 - Prometheus Award (Hall of Fame Award). Chosen by Time Magazine as one of the 100 best English-language novels from 1923 to 2005.Speculative fiction novel (1962) adapted to film in 1971 by Stanley Kubrick
Anthony Burgess
   wrote   
Earthly Powers
Memoirs of an 81 year-old homosexual writer. Shortlisted for the Booker prize.
Anthony Burgess
   wrote   
Inside Mr Enderby
Volume 1 of the best-selling Enderby Quartet
Anthony Burgess
   wrote   
Napoleon Symphony
A fictional recreation of the life and world of Napoleon Bonaparte
Anthony Burgess
   wrote   
One Hand Clapping
Originally published under the pseudonym Joseph Kell.
Anthony Powell
   wrote   
A Dance to the Music of Time
A twelve-volume cycle of novels by Anthony Powell, inspired by the painting of the same name by Nicolas Poussin.
Anthony Trollope
   wrote   
Barchester Towers
The second novel in Anthony Trollope's series known as the "Chronicles of Barsetshire". It is possibly Trollope's best known work.
Anthony Trollope
   wrote   
The Last Chronicle of Barset
The author considered this his finest novel
Anthony Trollope
   wrote   
Phineas Finn
Anthony Trollope
   wrote   
The Warden
(1855) This novel established Trollope's reputation as a writer and was the first in the Chronicles of Barsetshire series. It was Trollope's first novel.
Anthony Trollope
   wrote   
The Way We Live Now
First published in 1875 after first appearing in serialised form in 1864 and 1865. It is the first of six novels in the "Palliser" series. "The Pallisers', a 26-episode tv adaptation of all six Palliser novels, first broadcast in 1974
Antoine De Saint-Exupéry
   wrote   
The Little Prince
French aviator Antoine de Saint-Exupéry's most famous novel. It has been translated into more than 180 languages and sold more than 80 million copies making it one of the best-selling books ever.
Antonio Tabucchi
   wrote   
Pereira Declares: A Testimony
No. 126 on the list of '1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die' by Peter Boxall
Aphra Behn
   wrote   
Oroonoko
1688. Aphra Behn's Oroonoko is both one of the earliest English novels and one of the earliest by a woman.
Ardal O’Hanlon
   wrote   
The Talk of the Town
Aka. 'Knick Knack Paddy Whack'. A comedy. Ardal O’Hanlon is an Irish comedian and actor, best known for his roles in television sitcoms as Father Dougal McGuire in Father Ted and George Sunday in My Hero.
Arnold Bennett
   wrote   
The Old Wives’ Tale
Generally regarded as one of Bennett's finest works.
Arthur Golden
   wrote   
Memoirs of a Geisha
1997. Made into a movie of the same name.
Arthur Koestler
   wrote   
Darkness at Noon
1940. His most famous novel, it is set in 1938 during the Stalinist purges and Moscow show trials. It reflects the author's personal disillusionment with Communism
Arundhati Roy
   wrote   
The God of Small Things
It is a story about the childhood experiences of a pair of fraternal twins who become victims of circumstance. The book is a description of how the small things in life build up, translate into people's behavior and affect their lives. The book won the Booker Prize in 1997.
A. S. Byatt
   wrote   
Possession
Part historical and part contemporary fiction. 1990 The bestselling novel is a winner of the prestigious Man Booker Prize.
A. S. Byatt
   wrote   
Still Life
1985. 2nd book in the quartet that started with 'The Virgin in the Garden'. It won the PEN/Macmillan Silver Pen Award
August Strindberg
   wrote   
By the Open Sea
1890. An English translation of Strindberg's novel "I havsbandet".
August Strindberg
   wrote   
Natives of Hemsö
1887. Hemsö is a fictional island, but it is based on Kymmendö where Strindberg had spent time in his youth. Strindberg wrote the book to combat his homesickness while living abroad in Germany and France.
August Strindberg
   wrote   
The Red Room
1879. This is the novel which brought Swedish author Strindberg fame. It has been translated into several languages.
Ayn Rand
   wrote   
Atlas Shrugged
1957. It was Rand's fourth, longest, and last novel, and she considered it her magnum opus in the realm of fiction writing.
Ayn Rand
   wrote   
The Fountainhead
1943. Rand's first major literary success. The book's title is a reference to Rand's statement that "man's ego is the fountainhead of human progress".
Barbara Kingsolver
   wrote   
Pigs in Heaven
Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Fiction.
Barbara Kingsolver
   wrote   
The Poisonwood Bible
1998. A bestselling novel about a missionary family, the Prices, who in 1959 move from Georgia to the fictional village of Kilanga in the Belgian Congo. Won the National Book Prize of South Africa, was shortlisted for the Pulitzer Prize
Baroness Emmuska Orczy
   wrote   
The Scarlet Pimpernel
1905. a classic play and adventure novel by Baroness Emmuska Orczy, set during the Reign of Terror following the start of the French Revolution.
Barry Hines
   wrote   
A Kestrel for a Knave
The book was made into a film Kes and is often used in Key Stage 4 assessment in the UK, as part of GCSE English courses.
Benito Pérez Galdés
   wrote   
Fortunata and Jacinta
No. 186 on the list of '1001 Books You Must Read Before You Die' by Peter Boxall
Benjamin Disraeli
   wrote   
Sybil
. . . or, "The Two Nations" traces the plight of the working classes of England in 1844. The book is a roman à thèse, or a novel with a thesis — which was meant to create a propagandistic furor over the squalor that was plaguing England's working class cities.
Bernard Malamud
   wrote   
The Assistant
1957. The novel has been included in Time magazine's "All-Time 100 Novels"
Bernard Malamud
   wrote   
The Fixer
Pulitizer Prize and National Book Award winner, 1967
Bernard Malamud
   wrote   
The Natural
His first novel in 1952
Bernhard Schlink
   wrote   
The Reader
Schlink's novel was a huge commercial success not only in his native country but in the English-speaking world, becoming the first German novel to top the New York Times bestseller list when it was translated two years later.
Bertolt Brecht
   wrote   
Threepenny Novel
Evolved from 'The Threepenny Opera'
Bessie Head
   wrote   
A Question of Power
Bessie Head is usually considered Botswana's most important writer.
Betty Smith
   wrote   
A Tree Grows in Brooklyn
A nationwide best-seller that was distributed to servicemen overseas.
B. F. Skinner
   wrote   
Walden Two
1948. A utopian novel
Boccaccio
   wrote   
Decameron
A collection of 100 novellas by Italian author Giovanni Boccaccio, probably begun in 1350 and finished in 1353. It is a medieval allegorical work best known for its bawdy tales of love, appearing in all its possibilities from the erotic to the tragic.
Boris Pasternak
   wrote   
Doctor Zhivago
As the book was frowned upon by the Soviet authorities, Doctor Zhivago was smuggled abroad by his friend Isaiah Berlin. In 1958 and 1959, the American edition spent 26 weeks at the top of The New York Times' bestseller list.
Bram Stoker
   wrote   
Dracula
An epistolary novel told as a series of diary entries and letters. Although Stoker did not invent the vampire, the novel's influence on the popularity of vampires has been singularly responsible for many theatrical, film and television interpretations throughout the 20th and 21st centuries.
Brendan Behan
   wrote   
Borstal Boy
An autobiographical novel by Irish nationalist Brendan Behan, recounting his imprisonment at Hollesley Bay for carrying explosives into the United Kingdom, with intent to cause explosions on a mission for the I.R.A.. T
Bruce Chatwin
   wrote   
On the Black Hill
Published in 1982 and winner of the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for that year.
B. S. Johnson
   wrote   
Albert Angelo
Published in 1964, the book achieved fame for having holes cut in several pages as a narrative technique.
B. S. Johnson
   wrote   
House Mother Normal
A novel by the experimental writer B.S. Johnson. As is typical of Johnson's work the novel is written in an unorthodox style.
Carlo Levi
   wrote   
Christ Stopped at Eboli
1945. Gives an account of his exile from 1935-1936 to Aliano, a remote town in southern Italy, in the region of Lucania which is known today as Basilicata. In the book he gives the town the invented name 'Gagliano'.
Carl Sagan
   wrote   
Contact
A novel, 1985
Carol Shields
   wrote   
Larry's Party
1997 Winner of the Orange Prize, and the Prix de Livre
Carol Shields
   wrote   
The Stone Diaries
Won the U.S. Pulitzer Prize for Fiction as well as the Governor General's Award in Canada.
Carol Shields
   wrote   
Unless
2002 winner of the Ethel Wilson Fiction Prize, shortlisted for the 2003 Orange Prize
Carson McCullers
   wrote   
The Heart is a Lonely Hunter
1940. Made the best-seller lists in 1940. Time Magazine included the novel in its TIME 100 Best English-language Novels from 1923 to 2005.
Carson McCullers
   wrote   
Member of the Wedding
The book has been adapted for the stage, motion pictures, and television.
Cees Nooteboom
   wrote   
All Souls Day
A Dutch author. He has won the Prijs der Nederlandse Letteren, the P. C. Hooft Award, the Pegasus Prize, the Austrian State Prize for European Literature and the Constantijn Huygens Prize, and has frequently been mentioned as a candidate for the Nobel Prize in literature.
Cees Nooteboom
   wrote   
The Following Story
Het Volgende Verhaal". Won him the Aristeion Prize in 1993
Cesare Pavese
   wrote   
The Moon and the Bonfires
An English translation of the novel 'La Luna e i Falò'. The book was written in Italian in 1949. It is considered Pavese's best novel. Pavese is an Italian poet, novelist, literary critic and translator; he is widely considered among the major authors of the 20th century in his home country.
Charles Bukowski
   wrote   
Factotum
Factotum was adapted into a film of the same name starring Matt Dillon in 2005.
Charles Bukowski
   wrote   
Post Office
His first novel, 1971. Post Office may be said to be an autobiographical account of Bukowski's later years.
Charles Dickens
   wrote   
Barnaby Rudge
Historical novel with plot based on the "no-popery" or Gordon riots of 1780 in Great Britain
Charles Dickens
   wrote   
Bleak House
Dicken's 9th novel is an assault on the flaws of the British judiciary system in the 1800's
Charles Dickens
   wrote   
A Christmas Carol
Written as a potboiler to enable Dickens to pay off a debt
Charles Dickens
   wrote   
David Copperfield
The most autobiographical of his novels, it comes at the mid-point of Dickens' career
Charles Dickens
   wrote   
Dombey and Son
Deals with the then-prevalent practice of arranged marriages for financial gain or as a form of slavery
Charles Dickens
   wrote   
Great Expectations
Criticized for its excessive use of words due, it is said, to the fact he was paid by installment for his serialised work
Charles Dickens
   wrote   
Hard Times
The shortest of his novels, it was set in Coketown, not in London
Charles Dickens
   wrote   
The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby
Comic novel that takes aim at social injustices
Charles Dickens
   wrote   
Little Dorrit
A satire on debtor's prisons - each issue of Little Dorrit's 19 installments cost one shilling (except the last which cost two)
Charles Dickens
   wrote   
Martin Chuzzlewit
Depicts America satirically as a near wilderness filled with deceit
Charles Dickens
   wrote   
The Old Curiosity Shop
Follows the life of Little Nell and her grandfather, residents of The Old Curiosity Shop in London
Charles Dickens
   wrote   
Oliver Twist
One of the first English language novels to feature a child protagonist
Charles Dickens
   wrote   
Our Mutual Friend
Dickens' last completed novel; also the most challenging and complicated
Charles Dickens
   wrote   
The Pickwick Papers
Dickens' first novel, written as a serial in 19 issues
Charles Dickens
   wrote   
A Tale of Two Cities
A historical novel centering on the years leading up to the French Revolution
Charles Frazier
   wrote   
Cold Mountain
National Book Award, 1997; made into a popular movie
Charles Frazier
   wrote   
Thirteen Moons
2006; his second novel after 'Cold Mountain'. Charles Frazier was given an advance payment of over $8 million for a proposal that became 'Thirteen Moons'. The book had an initial print run of 750,000 copies, but sold only approximately half of them. It is estimated that Random House lost $5.5 million on the advance
Charles Reznikoff
   wrote   
By the Waters of Manhattan
Title exists in three different lives; as novel, anthology, and verse
Charles Webb
   wrote   
The Graduate
Made into the very successful film 'The Graduate'.
Charlotte Brontë
   wrote   
Jane Eyre
Classic romance novel about a governess whose employer falls in love with her
Charlotte Brontë
   wrote   
Shirley
Brontë's second published novel after Jane Eyre (originally published under Brontë's pseudonym Currer Bell). The novel's popularity led to Shirley becoming a woman's name. In the novel, Shirley Keeldar, the title character was given the name that her father had intended to give a son. Before the publication of the novel, Shirley was an uncommon - but distinctly male - name and would have been an unusual name for a woman.
Charlotte Brontë
   wrote   
Villette
Villette is most commonly celebrated for its explorations of gender roles and repression.
Charlotte Lennox
   wrote   
The Female Quixote
Lennox's second and most successful novel, 'The Female Quixote, or, The Adventures of Arabella'.
Charlotte Perkins Gilman
   wrote   
Herland
A Utopian novel which describes an isolated society composed entirely of women who reproduce via parthenogenesis.
Chester Hines
   wrote   
Blind Man With a Pistol
One of the Harlem Detective novels
Chinua Achebe
   wrote   
Anthills of the Savannah
A finalist for the 1987 Booker Prize for Fiction, it has been described as the "most important novel to come out of Africa in the [1980s]
Chinua Achebe
   wrote   
Arrow of God
It is Achebe's third novel following Things Fall Apart and No Longer at Ease. These three books are sometimes called The African Trilogy. Arrow of God won the first ever Jock Campbell/New Statesman Prize for African writing.
Chinua Achebe
   wrote   
A Man of the People
1966 satirical novel. It is Achebe's fourth novel.
Chinua Achebe
   wrote   
No Longer at Ease
The book's title comes from the closing lines of T. S. Eliot's poem, The Journey of the Magi.
Chinua Achebe
   wrote   
Things Fall Apart
It is a staple book in schools throughout Africa and widely read and studied in English-speaking countries around the world. It is seen as the archetypal modern African novel in English, and one of the first African novels written in English to receive global critical acclaim.
Christa Wolf
   wrote   
Patterns of Childhood
Wolf is one of the best-known writers to emerge from the former East Germany.
Chuck Palahniuk
   wrote   
Fight Club
Challenges the state of masculinity in American culture
Chuck Palahniuk
   wrote   
Survivor
The book's chapters and page numbers are put into reverse order - it begins with Chapter 47 on page 289 and ends with Chapter 1 on page 1.
Cicero
   wrote   
On Old Age
An essay written by Cicero in 44 BC on the subject of aging and death. In addition to its profound subject matter, it has remained popular because its clear and beautiful language have made it a useful example for teaching Latin to students.
Clarice Lispector
   wrote   
Near to the Wild Heart
Won the prestigious Graça Aranha Prize.
Clarice Lispector
   wrote   
The Passion According to G.H.
1964. A mystical novel. The work takes the form of a monologue by a woman, identified only as G.H., telling of the crisis that ensued the previous day after she crushed a cockroach in the door of a wardrobe. Its canonical status was recognized in 1988 by its inclusion in the Arquivos Collection, the UNESCO series of critical editions of the greatest works of Latin American literature.
Colin MacInnes
   wrote   
Absolute Beginners
He novel is the second of MacInnes' London Trilogy, coming after City Of Spades (1958) and before Mr. Love and Justice (1960). These novels are each self-contained, with no shared characters.
Colleen McCullough
   wrote   
The Thorn Birds
2004. Best-seller made into a very successful miniseries.
Colm Tóibín
   wrote   
The Blackwater Lightship
Shortlisted for the 1999 Booker Prize and the 2001 International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award.
Colm Tóibín
   wrote   
The Master
Won the 2006 International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, was shortlisted for the 2004 Booker Prize, won the L.A. Times Novel of the Year, the Stonewall Book Award & the Lambda Literary Award, and was listed by The New York Times as one of the 10 most notable books of 2004.
Comte De Lautréaumont
   wrote   
The Songs of Maldoror
Les Chants de Maldoror (The Songs of Maldoror) is a poetic novel (or a long prose poem) consisting of six cantos.
Cormac McCarthy
   wrote   
All the Pretty Horses
National Book Award, 1992
Cormac McCarthy
   wrote   
Blood Meridian
1985. Was among Time Magazine's poll of 100 best English-language books published between 1923 and 2005 and he placed joint runner-up for a similar title in a poll taken in 2006 by The New York Times of the best American fiction published in the last 25 years.
Cormac McCarthy
   wrote   
The Road
The novel was awarded the 2007 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the James Tait Black Memorial Prize for Fiction in 2006.
Daniel Defoe
   wrote   
A Journal of the Plague Year
Thought by some to be non-fiction it is actually a fictionalised account of one man's experiences of the year 1665, in which the Great Plague struck the city of London.
Daniel Defoe
   wrote   
Moll Flanders
A lower class woman travels among the wealthy and exposes their vanity and shallowness. The full title is 'The Fortunes and Misfortunes of the Famous Moll Flanders, Etc. Who Was Born In Newgate, and During a Life of Continu'd Variety For Threescore Years, Besides Her Childhood, Was Twelve Year a Whore, Five Times a Wife [Whereof Once To Her Own Brother], Twelve Year a Thief, Eight Year a Transported Felon In Virginia, At Last Grew Rich, Liv'd Honest, and Died a Penitent. Written from her own Memorandums.'
Daniel Defoe
   wrote   
Robinson Crusoe
Often regarded as the first novel in English, it is a fictional autobiography of an English castaway and his rescue. Defoe is notable for being one of the earliest practitioners of the novel, as he helped to popularise the form in Britain, and is even referred to by some as one of the founders of the English novel.
Daniel Defoe
   wrote   
Roxana: The Fortunate Mistress
The full title of the novel is 'Roxana: The Fortunate Mistress Or, a History of the Life and Vast Variety of Fortunes of Mademoiselle de Beleau, Afterwards Called the Countess de Wintselsheim'.
Daphne Du Maurier
   wrote   
Jamaica Inn
Best-seller. Made into a film by Alfred Hitchcock.
Daphne Du Maurier
   wrote   
Rebecca
Best-seller with the famous opening line, "Last night I dreamt I went to Manderley again." The classic, haunting story of love, and mystery.
David Dabydeen
   wrote   
A Harlot's Progress
James Tait Black Memorial Prize (for fiction) (shortlist)
David Foster Wallace
   wrote   
Infinite Jest
Time magazine included the novel in its TIME 100 Best English-language Novels from 1923 to 2005 list.
David Jones
   wrote   
In Parenthesis
Won the Hawthornden Prize. Written in a mixture of verse and prose: it defies categorization as either poem or novel, and critics still differ as to what term best applies.
David Leavitt
   wrote   
Lost Language of Cranes
The first novel by David Leavitt, and deals primarily with the difficulties a young gay man, Philip, has in coming out to his parents
David Markson
   wrote   
Wittgenstein’s Mistress
Though Markson's original manuscript was rejected 54 times, the book, when finally published it met with critical acclaim.
David Mitchell
   wrote   
Cloud Atlas
A young Pacific islander witnesses the nightfall of science and civilisation, while questions of history are explored in a series of seemingly disconnected narratives. Cloud Atlas was shortlisted for the 2004 Man Booker Prize for Fiction.
David Mitchell
   wrote   
Number9dream
Shortlisted for the 2002 Man Booker Prize for fiction. It is set in modern day Tokyo and tells the story of Eiji Miyake's search for his father.
David Peace
   wrote   
Nineteen Seventy Seven
Part of the Red-Riding Quartet comprises the novels Nineteen Seventy-Four (1999), Nineteen Seventy-Seven (2000), Nineteen Eighty (2001) and Nineteen Eighty-Three (2002), which deal with police corruption, set against a backdrop of the Yorkshire Ripper murders, and feature several recurring characters across the four books. Red Riding, a TV adaptation of the series, aired in the UK in 2009.
Denis Diderot
   wrote   
Jacques the Fatalist
'Jacques le Fataliste et Son Maître'
Denis Diderot
   wrote   
The Nun
The novel was supposedly begun originally not as a work for literary consumption but as an elaborate practical joke aimed at luring the Marquis de Croismare, a companion of Diderot's, back to Paris. The novel is told in a series of letters purporting to be from a nun, Suzanne, who implores the Marquis to help her in renouncing her vows, and describes her intolerable life in the convent. Diderot later revised the letters into a novel and publicly revealed his role in the ruse.
Denis Diderot
   wrote   
Rameau’s Nephew
Rameau's Nephew, or the Second Satire (French: Le Neveu de Rameau ou La Satire seconde) is an imaginary philosophical conversation
Dan Gerber
   wrote   
American Atlas
Gerber's experiences are expressed in this novel, as with later novels such as Out of Control and A Voice from the River, through the story of man's search for meaning and purpose in life. In these works Gerber dramatizes his characters' reevaluations of career, family life, and values.
D. H. Lawrence
   wrote   
Lady Chatterley's Lover
Its publication in 1928 caused a scandal due to its explicit sex scenes. Not printed in the UK until 1960.
D. H. Lawrence
   wrote   
The Rainbow
Subject of an obscenity trial in 1915. Copies were seized and burned. Banned in UK for 11 years.
D. H. Lawrence
   wrote   
Sons and Lovers
This autobiographical novel is 9th on the list of the 100 best novels in English of the 20th century (Modern Library)
D. H. Lawrence
   wrote   
Women in Love
It is a sequel to his earlier novel The Rainbow (1915), and follows the continuing loves and lives of the Brangwen sisters, Gudrun and Ursula.
Dino Buzzati
   wrote   
The Tartar Steppe
Dino Buzzati Traverso was an Italian novelist, short story writer, painter and poet, as well as a journalist for Corriere della Sera. His worldwide fame is mostly due to this novel 'Il deserto dei Tartari'.
Djuna Barnes
   wrote   
Nightwood
Nightwood became a cult work of modern fiction, helped by an introduction by T. S. Eliot. It stands out today for its portrayal of lesbian themes and its distinctive writing style.
Donald Barthelme
   wrote   
The Dead Father
1975. The Dead Father fully supports Barthelme's claim that in the contemporary age, physicist Werner Heisenberg's "uncertainty principle is our song of songs."
Donald Barthelme
   wrote   
King
Clever anachronisms and mock-Arthurian diction mark this madcap, absurdist 20th-century parable, in which Barthelme transposes King Arthur and his Round Table to 1940s England under Nazi bombardment.
Donald Barthelme
   wrote   
Paradise
Paradise touches on a wide variety of themes as it explores the experiences, thoughts, and memories of its central character, Simon. Marriage, sexual and economic power, midlife crisis, generation gaps, male inadequacy, male fantasy, the element of fear in urban life, the responsibility of the artist, feminism, and religious ideas of guilt and grace all appear
Donald Barthelme
   wrote   
Snow White
Snow White re-contextualizes the famous fairy tale as a 1960s commune consisting of seven men and one woman, and satirizes the sociopolitical issues infesting that turbulent decade.
Don DeLillo
   wrote   
Libra
It focuses on the life of Lee Harvey Oswald and offers a speculative account of the events that shaped the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.
Don DeLillo
   wrote   
Underworld
Underworld was the runner-up on the New York Times' survey of the best work of American fiction in the last 25 years, announced in May 2006.
Don DeLillo
   wrote   
White Noise
Won the National Book Award
Donna Tartt
   wrote   
The Little Friend
The novel won the WH Smith Literary Award and was shortlisted for the Orange Prize for Fiction in 2003.
Doris Lessing
   wrote   
The Four Gated City
Regarded as one of Lessing's most important works. The book, which finishes like a science fiction story with its bloody end to an epoch, created a stir upon publication, with claims that the novel promoted communism.
Doris Lessing
   wrote   
The Golden Notebook
1962. Time Magazine included the novel in its TIME 100 Best English-language Novels from 1923 to 2005
Doris Lessing
   wrote   
The Good Terrorist
The novel was shortlisted for the Booker Prize and received The W.H. Smith Literary Award (1985) and the Italian Mondello Prize (1985)
Doris Lessing
   wrote   
The Grass is Singing
Lessing won the Nobel Prize in Literature. She was described by the Swedish Academy as "that epicist of the female experience, who with scepticism, fire and visionary power has subjected a divided civilisation to scrutiny". Lessing is the 11th woman to win the prize in its 106-year history, and also the oldest person ever to win the literature award.
Dorothy Richardson
   wrote   
Pointed Roofs
Novel 1 in the Pilgramage series. Richardson was the first writer to publish an English-language novel using what was to become known as the stream-of-consciousness technique. Her 13 novel sequence Pilgrimage is considered one of the great 20th C works of modernist and feminist literature in English.
Dan Sleigh
   wrote   
Islands
This novel covers the first half-century or so of Dutch settlement at the Cape, opening with a view from the inside of a Khoi nation, the Goringhaicona, under the leadership of Autshumao, dubbed "chief Harry" by early English visitors.
E. Annie Proulx
   wrote   
Postcards
Won the PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction for her first novel
E. Annie Proulx
   wrote   
The Shipping News
National Book Award, 1993; Pulitizer Prize, 1994
Edgar Rice Burroughs
   wrote   
Tarzan of the Apes
The first in a series of books about the title character Tarzan. It was first published in the pulp magazine All-Story Magazine
Edith Wharton
   wrote   
The Age of Innocence
Won the 1921 Pulitzer Prize
Edith Wharton
   wrote   
Ethan Frome
An unnamed narrator recounts his encounter with a man from Starkfield, Massachusetts (1911)
Edith Wharton
   wrote   
The House of Mirth
1905. A novel about New York socialite Lily Bart attempting to secure a husband and a place in rich society. It is one of the first novels of manners in American literature.
Edith Wharton
   wrote   
Summer
He story is one of only two novels by Wharton to be set in New England; Wharton was best known for her portrayals of upper class New York society.
Edmund White
   wrote   
A Boy’s Own Story
The 1st of an autobiographical-fiction series that continued with 'The Beautiful Room Is Empty' and 'The Farewell Symphony', describing stages in the life of a gay man from boyhood to middle age.
Edna O’Brien
   wrote   
The Country Girls
The first in a trilogy.
Edna O’Brien
   wrote   
Wild Decembers
Made into a movie of the same name.
Edward Paul Abbey
   wrote   
The Monkey Wrench Gang
Easily Abbey's most famous fiction work, the novel concerns the use of sabotage to protest environmentally damaging activities in the American Southwest, and was so influential that the term "monkeywrench" has come to mean, besides sabotage and damage to machines, any action to preserve wilderness and ecosystems.
Edwin Abbott
   wrote   
Onesimus
Religious romance by the author of Flatland
Edwin Abbott
   wrote   
Philochristus
Religious romance by the author of Flatland
Edwin Abbott
   wrote   
Sitanus
Religious romance by the author of Flatland
E. E. Cummings
   wrote   
The Enormous Room
Autobiographical novel by the poet and novelist E. E. Cummings about his temporary imprisonment in France during World War I.
E. L. Doctorow
   wrote   
Billy Bathgate
Won the PEN/Faulkner Award, the National Book Critics Circle Award, was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, and received the William Dean Howells Medal of the American Academy of Arts and Letters for the best novel of the previous five-year period.
E. L. Doctorow
   wrote   
The Book of Daniel
Nominated for a National Book Award, it fictionalized the story of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, who were executed in 1953 for allegedly giving nuclear secrets to the Soviet Union.
E. L. Doctorow
   wrote   
Ragtime
Received the National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction and an award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters
E. L. Doctorow
   wrote   
World's Fair
National Book Award, 1986
Elfriede Jelinek
   wrote   
The Piano Teacher
Translation of 'Die Klavierspielerin' by Joachim NeugroschelJelinek was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2004.
Elias Canetti
   wrote   
Auto-da-Fé
Canetti won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1981. (Original title 'Die Blendung', 'The Blinding')
Elio Vittorini
   wrote   
In Sicily
First appeared in serial form in 'Letteratura' in 1938, and was first published as the novel 'Nome e Lagrime'.
Elizabeth Bowen
   wrote   
The Death of the Heart
Set between the two world wars. It is about a sixteen year old orphan, Portia Quayne, who moves to London to live with her half-brother Thomas and falls in love with Eddie, a friend of her sister-in-law. The novel was adapted into a 1986 TV miniseries.
Elizabeth Bowen
   wrote   
Eva Trout
Her final novel.
Elizabeth Bowen
   wrote   
The House in Paris
The novel has been called "one of Elizabeth Bowen's most artful and psychologically astute novels".
Elizabeth Bowen
   wrote   
The Last September
Concerns life at the country mansion of Danielstown, Cork during the Irish War of Independence.
Elizabeth Gaskell
   wrote   
Cranford
The best-known novel of the 19th century English writer. It was first published in 1851 as a serial in the magazine Household Words, which was edited by Charles Dickens.
Elizabeth Gaskell
   wrote   
Mary Barton
Her first novel. The story is set in the English city of Manchester during the 1830s and 1840s and deals heavily with the difficulties faced by the Victorian lower class.
Elizabeth Gaskell
   wrote   
North and South
Originally appeared as a twenty-two-part weekly serial from September 1854 through January 1855 in the magazine Household Words, edited by Charles Dickens.
Elizabeth Gaskell
   wrote   
Wives and Daughters
Story about Molly Gibson, the only daughter of a widowed doctor in a provincial English town in the 1830's. First published in the Cornhill Magazine as a serial from August 1864 to January 1866. When Mrs Gaskell died suddenly in 1865, it was not quite complete, and the last section was written by Frederick Greenwood.
Elizabeth Taylor
   wrote   
Mrs Palfrey at the Claremont
Not of movie fame, Ms. Taylor was born and educated in Reading, lived in Buckinghamshire; was a governess and librarian
Elmore Leonard
   wrote   
Get Shorty
The novel was adapted into a film of the same name.
E. M. Forster
   wrote   
Howards End
A class struggle in turn-of-the-century England (1910)
E. M. Forster
   wrote   
A Passage to India
Set during the Indian independence movement of the 1920's, it foreshadows the end of the British Raj.
E. M. Forster
   wrote   
A Room With A View
The romance of a young woman in sexually repressed Edwardian England
E. M. Forster
   wrote   
Where Angels Fear to Tread
Originally entitled 'Monteriano'. The title comes from a line in Alexander Pope's An Essay on Criticism: "For fools rush in where angels fear to tread".
Emily Brontë
   wrote   
Wuthering Heights
Bronte's only novel is considered a classic of English literature (1847)
Erich Maria Remarque
   wrote   
All Quiet on the Western Front
War novel. The book describes in graphic detail the German soldiers' extreme physical and mental duress experienced during fighting in this war, and the detachment from civilian life felt by many of these soldiers upon returning home from the front.
Erica Jong
   wrote   
Fear of Flying
This 1973 novel, controversial for its attitudes on female sexuality, played a role in the development of feminism
Erica Jong
   wrote   
Sappho's Leap
B. 1942
Ernest Hemingway
   wrote   
A Farewell To Arms
The novel is told through the point of view of Lieutenant Frederic Henry, an American serving as an ambulance driver in the Italian army during World War I. The title is taken from a poem by 16th century English dramatist George Peele. Widely regarded to be amongst Hemingway's greatest works.
Ernest Hemingway
   wrote   
For Whom the Bell Tolls
The title is taken from "Meditation XVII," a metaphysical poem by John Donne ("No man is an island," etc.). This novel is widely regarded to be amongst Hemingway's greatest works.
Ernest Hemingway
   wrote   
The Old Man and the Sea
This novella is the last major work of fiction for Hemingway
Ernest Hemingway
   wrote   
The Sun Also Rises
First significant novel by Hemingway centers on a group of expatriate Americans in Europe in the 1920's
Erskine Caldwell
   wrote   
God's Little Acre
The novel was so controversial that a literary board in New York attempted to censor it, leading to the author's arrest and trial for obscenity. Exonerated after a jury trial, the author counter-sued the literary society for false arrest and malicious prosecution. It is laced throughout with racy innuendo, calling into question the issue of marital fidelity
Erskine Caldwell
   wrote   
Tobacco Road
1932. Tobacco Road is set in Augusta, Georgia during the worst years of the Great Depression.
Erskine Childers
   wrote   
The Riddle of the Sands
Childers was an Irish nationalist, who was executed by the authorities of the nascent Irish Free State during the Irish Civil War. The Observer, in a "fundamentally English" list, listed the book as #37 on its list of "The 100 Greatest Novels" from the past 300 years.
Esther Freud
   wrote   
Hideous Kinky
An autobiographical novel
Eudora Welty
   wrote   
The Optimist's Daughter
Pulitizer Prize, 1973
Evelyn Waugh
   wrote   
Brideshead Revisited
1945. Full title: 'Brideshead Revisited, The Sacred & Profane Memories of Captain Charles Ryder'.
Evelyn Waugh
   wrote   
Decline and Fall
A social satire that employs the author's characteristic black humour in lampooning various features of British society in the 1920s.
Evelyn Waugh
   wrote   
A Handful of Dust
It is included in Modern Library List of Best 20th-Century Novels, and Time Magazine's 100 Best English-language Novels from 1923 to 2005. The title is an allusion to T. S. Eliot's 1922 poem The Waste Land.
Evelyn Waugh
   wrote   
Scoop
Based partly on his experience working for the Daily Mail. Waugh scooped a story on Mussolini's invasion of Abyssinia.
Evelyn Waugh
   wrote   
Vile Bodies
Satirises decadent young London society between World War I and World War II. The title comes from the Epistle to the Philippians 3:21.
Fanny Burney
   wrote   
Camilla
Subtitled A Picture of Youth. Published in 1796
Fanny Burney
   wrote   
Cecilia
Subtitled Memoirs of an Heiress. Set in 1779 and published in 1782.
Fanny Burney
   wrote   
Evelina
Subtitled 'The History of a Young Lady's Entrance into the World'.
Fielding Dawson
   wrote   
A Great Day for a Ballgame
'A Great Day for a Ballgame: A Conscious Love Story'. A male-perspective love story.
Flannery O’Connor
   wrote   
The Violent Bear It Away
Her 2nd and final novel. It is the story of Francis Tarwater, a fourteen-year-old boy who is trying to escape his destiny: the life of a prophet.
Flannery O’Connor
   wrote   
Wise Blood
Her first novel.
Flann O’Brien
   wrote   
At Swim-Two-Birds
It is widely considered to be O'Brien's masterpiece, and one of the most sophisticated examples of metafiction.
Flann O’Brien
   wrote   
The Third Policeman
A novel by Irish author Brian O'Nolan, writing under the pseudonym Flann O'Brien. Was published after his death.
Ford Madox Ford
   wrote   
The Good Soldier
It is set just before World War I and chronicles the tragedies of the lives of two seemingly perfect couples. Uses a series of flashbacks, a literary technique that Ford pioneered.
Ford Madox Ford
   wrote   
Parade’s End
A tetralogy (four related novels) by Ford Madox Ford published between 1924 and 1928. It is set in England and on the Western Front in World War I, where Ford served as an officer in the Royal Welch Fusiliers. The four novels were originally published under the titles: Some Do Not... (1924), No More Parades (1925), A Man Could Stand Up (1926), and The Last Post (1928). The compilation was ranked at number 57 on the Modern Library's 100 Best Novels list.
Françoise Rabelais
   wrote   
Gargantua and Pantagruel
A connected series of 5 novels written in the 16th C. It is the story of two giants, a father (Gargantua) and his son (Pantagruel) and their adventures, written in an amusing, extravagant, satirical vein. There is much crudity and scatological humor as well as a large amount of violence. Long lists of vulgar insults fill several chapters.
Françoise Sagan
   wrote   
Bonjour Tristesse
Published in 1954, when the author was only eighteen, it caused an overnight sensation. The title is derived from a poem by Paul Éluard, "À peine défigurée,".
Françoise Sagan
   wrote   
Goodbye Again
American version of Aimez-vous Brahms
François Mauriac
   wrote   
The Desert of Love
1925. 'Le Désert de l'amour'. Awarded the Grand Prix du roman de l'Académie française. Generally regarded as the best book of the Nobel Prize winning Mauriac.
François Mauriac
   wrote   
Therese
1927 His characters exist in a tortured universe; nature is evil and man eternally prone to sin.
François Mauriac
   wrote   
Vipers' Tangle
1941 His novels are imbued with his profound, though nonconformist, Roman Catholicism.
Franz Kafka
   wrote   
Amerika
Also known as 'Der Verschollene' or 'The Man Who Disappeared', was the incomplete first novel of author Franz Kafka, published posthumously in 1927. The novel originally began as a short story titled The Stoker.
Franz Kafka
   wrote   
The Castle
Dark and at times surreal, The Castle is about alienation, bureaucracy, and the seemingly endless frustrations of man's attempts to stand against the system.
Franz Kafka
   wrote   
Metamorphosis
A novella about a traveling salesman who wakes transformed into a "montstrous vermin."
Franz Kafka
   wrote   
The Trial
Josef K is arrested and subjected to the judicial process for an unspecified crime
Frederick Exley
   wrote   
A Fan's Notes
1968 Subtitled "A Fictional Memoir" and categorized as fiction, the book is somewhat autobiographical. The novel was nominated for the National Book Award. It also received the William Faulkner Award for best first novel, the Rosenthal Award from the National Institute of Arts and Letters, and earned Exley a Rockefeller Foundation grant worth $10,000
Frederick Exley
   wrote   
Last Notes From Home
1988 The final novel of his semi-autobiographical trilogy.
Frederick Exley
   wrote   
Pages From a Cold Island
1975. The 2nd novel of his semi-autobiographical trilogy.
Frederick Manfred
   wrote   
Lord Grizzly
Manfred's most successful book, and a finalist for the National Book Award in 1954.
Frederick Rolfe
   wrote   
Hadrian the Seventh
Rolfe wrote under the pseudonym "Baron Corvo". Rolfe's most well known work, this novel of extreme wish-fulfilment developed out of an article he wrote on the Papal Conclave to elect the successor to Pope Leo XIII.
Frederic Manning
   wrote   
Her Privates We
An expurgated version of 'The Middle Parts of Fortune'. The original publication of this edition credited authorship to "Private 19022", possibly a simple desire for anonymity or possibly a further pun on "private soldier" and "private parts"
Friedrich Hölderlin
   wrote   
Hyperion
The full title is Hyperion oder Der Eremit in Griechenland. The work is composed of letters from Hyperion to his friends Bellarmin and the writer Diotima. It is set in Greece and deals with invisible forces, conflicts, beauty, and hope.
Friedrich Nietzsche
   wrote   
Thus Spoke Zarathustra
'Thus Spoke Zarathustra: A Book for All and None' is a philosophical novel.
F. Scott Fitzgerald
   wrote   
The Beautiful and the Damned
1922. The novel provides an excellent portrait of the Eastern elite as the Jazz Age begins its ascent, engulfing all classes into what will soon be known as Café Society. As with all of his other novels, it is a brilliant character study and is also an early account of the complexities of marriage and intimacy that were further explored in 'Tender Is the Night'.
F. Scott Fitzgerald
   wrote   
The Great Gatsby
A chronical of the "Jazz Age". Time magazine's #7 in its list of the Ten Greatest Books of All Time.
F. Scott Fitzgerald
   wrote   
Tender is the Night
1934. It is ranked #28 on the Modern Library's list of the 100 Greatest Novels of the 20th Century.
F. Scott Fitzgerald
   wrote   
This Side of Paradise
1920. Fitzgerald's debut novel. Published in 1920, and taking its title from a line of the Rupert Brooke poem 'Tiare Tahiti', the book examines the lives and morality of post-World War I youth.
Fyodor Dostoevsky
   wrote   
The Brothers Karamazov
Dostoyevsky intended it to be the first part in an epic story titled The Life of a Great Sinner, but he died less than four months after its publication.
Fyodor Dostoevsky
   wrote   
Crime and Punishment
Story about the murder of a miserly pawnbroker, her younger sister, and the effects that follow.
Fyodor Dostoevsky
   wrote   
The Devils
There are at least three popular translations: The Possessed, The Devils, and Demons.
Fyodor Dostoevsky
   wrote   
The Gambler
The novella reflects Dostoevsky's own addiction to roulette, which was in more ways than one the inspiration for the book: Dostoevsky completed the novella under a strict deadline so he could pay off gambling debts.
Fyodor Dostoevsky
   wrote   
The Idiot
Dostoyevsky's motives for writing The Idiot stem from his desire to depict the "positively good man".
Fyodor Dostoevsky
   wrote   
Notes from the Underground
A short novel. It is considered by many to be the world's first existentialist novel. It presents itself as an excerpt from the rambling memoirs of a bitter, isolated, unnamed narrator (generally referred to by critics as the Underground Man) who is a retired civil servant living in St. Petersburg.
Gabriel García Márquez
   wrote   
The Autumn of the Patriarch
A "poem on the solitude of power" according to the author, the novel is a flowing tract on the life of an eternal dictator. The book is divided into six sections, each retelling the same story of the infinite power held by the archetypical Caribbean tyrant.
Gabriel García Márquez
   wrote   
Chronicle of a Death Foretold
Novella. It tells, in the form of a pseudo-journalistic reconstruction, the story of the murder of Santiago Nasar by the two Vicario brothers.
Gabriel García Márquez
   wrote   
The General in His Labyrinth
It is a fictionalized account of the last days of Simón Bolívar, liberator and leader of Gran Colombia. First published in 1989, the book traces Bolívar's final journey from Bogotá to the Caribbean coastline of Colombia in his attempt to leave South America for exile in Europe.
Gabriel García Márquez
   wrote   
Love in the Time of Cholera
A fifty year love triangle about unrequited love and the nobility of suffering
Gabriel García Márquez
   wrote   
No One Writes to the Colonel
A novella written by the Colombian novelist and Nobel Prize winner Gabriel García Márquez.
Gabriel García Márquez
   wrote   
One Hundred Years of Solitude
Metaphorically encompasses the history of Colombia. It was an immense commercial success, becoming the best-selling book in Spanish in modern history, after 'Don Quixote'
Geoffrey Chaucer
   wrote   
Canterbury Tales
A collection of stories written in the 14th C (2 of them in prose, the remaining twenty-two in verse). The tales are contained inside a frame tale and told by a collection of pilgrims on a pilgrimage from Southwark to visit the shrine of Saint Thomas Becket at Canterbury Cathedral.
George Eliot
   wrote   
Adam Bede
A.k.a. Mary Ann Evans, this was her first novel in 1859
George Eliot
   wrote   
Daniel Deronda
Many critics accuse the novel as a propaganda tool to encourage British patriation of Palestine to the Jews.
George Eliot
   wrote   
Middlemarch
Victorian era novel and Time magazine's #10 in their list of "The 10 Greatest Books of All Time"
George Eliot
   wrote   
The Mill on the Floss
A brother and sister grow up on the fictional river Floss in the 1820's
George Eliot
   wrote   
Silas Marner
Written during the Industrial Revolution and may be a reaction against it. (1861)
George Gissing
   wrote   
Born in Exile
Gissing was one of the most accomplished realists of the late-Victorian era.
George Gissing
   wrote   
New Grub Street
Set in the literary and journalistic circles of 1880s London.
George Orwell
   wrote   
Animal Farm
Famous satirical allegory of Soviet totalitarianism during the Stalin era.
George Orwell
   wrote   
Burmese Days
A tale about the waning days of British imperialism after World War I.
George Orwell
   wrote   
Coming Up for Air
It is the most culturally English of his novels with alarums of war mingling with images of an idyllic Thames-side Edwardian childhood. The novel is pessimistic - industrialism and capitalism have killed the best of Old England, and there are great, new external threats.
George Orwell
   wrote   
Keep the Aspidistra Flying
It is set in 1930s London. The main theme is the protagonist's romantic ambition to give up money and status, and the dismal life that results.
Georges Bataille
   wrote   
The Abbot C
Georges Bataille's first published novella. It is a work of dark eroticism, centred on the relationship between two nineteenth century brothers in a small French village, one of whom is a Catholic parish priest, while the other is a libertine. It explores issues of split subjectivity and existentialist bad faith.
Georges Bataille
   wrote   
Blue Noon
A transgressive novella of erotic fiction
Georges Bataille
   wrote   
Story of the Eye
A novella written by Georges Bataille and published in 1928 that details the increasingly bizarre sexual perversions of a pair of teenage lovers. It is narrated by the young man looking back on his exploits. It takes its title from an eye which the narrator extracts from the socket of one of his victims, and which is then used as a sexual fetish.
Georges Perec
   wrote   
Life: A User’s Manual
An immensely complex and rich work; a tapestry of interwoven stories and ideas and literary and historical allusions, based on the lives of the inhabitants of a fictitious Parisian apartment block, 11 Rue Simon-Crubellier (no such street exists, although the quadrangle Perec claims Simon-Crubellier cuts through does exist in Paris XVII). It was written according to a complex plan of writing constraints, and is primarily constructed from several elements, each adding a layer of complexity.
Georges Perec
   wrote   
A Void
A 300 page French lipogrammatic novel, written in 1969, entirely without the letter e (except for the author's name), following Oulipo constraints.
Georges Perec
   wrote   
W, or the Memory of Childhood
Consists of alternating chapters of autobiography and of a fictional story, divided into two parts.
George & Weedon Grossmith
   wrote   
The Diary of a Nobody
English comic novel spawning the word "Pooterism" to describe a tendency to take oneself too seriously.
Gert Hofmann
   wrote   
The Parable of the Blind
Inspired by Parabel der Blinden (1568), a painting by artist Pieter Bruegel, the short novel tells the story of the work's creation from the point of view of the 6 blind men depicted in the painting.
Gertrude Stein
   wrote   
The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas
A novel written in the style of an autobiography by her lover, Alice B. Toklas.
Gertrude Stein
   wrote   
Tender Buttons: Objects, Food, Rooms
Consists of word clusters chosen for their prosody, juxtaposed for the purpose of subverting commonplace dictionary meanings which Stein believed had largely lost their expressive force and ability to communicate.
Gertrude Stein
   wrote   
Three Lives
Gertrude Stein's first published work. The book is separated into three novellas, "The Good Anna," "Melanctha," and "The Gentle Lena." The 3 stories are independent of each other, but all are set in the fictional town of Bridgepoint.
Giorgio Bassani
   wrote   
The Garden of the Finzi-Continis
Giorgio De Chirico
   wrote   
Hebdomeros
Giovanni Verga
   wrote   
The House by the Medlar Tree
Giuseppe Tomasi Di Lampedusa
   wrote   
The Leopard
Günter Grass
   wrote   
Cat and Mouse
Günter Grass
   wrote   
Dog Years
1965
Günter Grass
   wrote   
The Flounder
1978
Günter Grass
   wrote   
The Tin Drum
1959. German novel of insanity placed around World War II.
Gore Vidal
   wrote   
Burr
1973
Gore Vidal
   wrote   
Empire
1987
Gore Vidal
   wrote   
Myra Breckenridge
Satirical novel written in the form of a diary, it has a sequel named "Myron"
Graham Greene
   wrote   
Brighton Rock
Underworld thriller and exploration of the nature of sin and the basis of morality
Graham Greene
   wrote   
Doctor Fischer of Geneva or the Bomb Party
Graham Greene
   wrote   
The End of the Affair
Graham Greene
   wrote   
England Made Me
Graham Greene
   wrote   
The Heart of the Matter
1948
Graham Greene
   wrote   
The Honorary Consul
Graham Greene
   wrote   
The Man Within
A reluctant smuggler betrays his colleagues
Graham Greene
   wrote   
Our Man in Havana
Graham Greene
   wrote   
The Power and the Glory
1940
Graham Greene
   wrote   
The Quiet American
Criticism of U.S. Foreign Policy
Graham Greene
   wrote   
The Third Man
Graham Swift
   wrote   
The Light of Day
Graham Swift
   wrote   
Waterland
Gustave Flaubert
   wrote   
Bouvard and Pécuchet
Gustave Flaubert
   wrote   
Madame Bovary
One of the first modern realistic novels, it was attacked for obscenity upon its release in France in the mid-1800's
Gustave Flaubert
   wrote   
Sentimental Education
Gustave Flaubert
   wrote   
The Temptation of Saint Anthony
Guy De Maupassant
   wrote   
Bel-Ami
Guy De Maupassant
   wrote   
Pierre and Jean
Guy De Maupassant
   wrote   
A Woman’s Life
G. V. Desani
   wrote   
All About H. Hatterr
Halldór Laxness
   wrote   
Independent People
Hanif Kureishi
   wrote   
The Buddha of Suburbia
Hanif Kureishi
   wrote   
Gabriel’s Gift
Hanif Kureishi
   wrote   
Intimacy
Harper Lee
   wrote   
To Kill A Mockingbird
"Coming of age" story, it was Lee's only novel.
Harriett Beecher Stowe
   wrote   
Uncle Tom's Cabin
Or Life Among the Lonely
Harry Mathews
   wrote   
Cigarettes
Harry Mulisch
   wrote   
The Discovery of Heaven
Haruki Murakami
   wrote   
After the Quake
Haruki Murakami
   wrote   
Kafka on the Shore
Haruki Murakami
   wrote   
Sputnik Sweetheart
Haruki Murakami
   wrote   
The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle
Héctor Abad Faciolince
   wrote   
The Oblivion We Shall Be
H. D. (Hilda Doolittle)
   wrote   
Asphodel
Heather McGowan
   wrote   
Schooling
Heinrich Böll
   wrote   
Billiards at Half-past Nine
Heinrich Böll
   wrote   
Group Portrait With Lady
Heinrich Böll
   wrote   
The Lost Honour of Katharina Blum
Heinrich Böll
   wrote   
The Safety Net
Heinrich Mann
   wrote   
Professor Unrat
Heliodorus
   wrote   
Aithiopika
Hella Haasse
   wrote   
Forever a Stranger
Henri Alain-Fournier
   wrote   
Le Grand Meaulnes
1913: his only novel. He was killed in WWI.
Henri Barbusse
   wrote   
The Inferno
Henri Barbusse
   wrote   
Under Fire
Henry Fielding
   wrote   
Amelia
Henry Fielding
   wrote   
Joseph Andrews
Henry Fielding
   wrote   
Tom Jones
Considered one of the first prose works describable as a novel, released in 1749.
Henry Green
   wrote   
Back
Henry Green
   wrote   
Blindness
Henry Green
   wrote   
Caught
Henry Green
   wrote   
Living
Henry Green
   wrote   
Loving
Henry Green
   wrote   
Party Going
Henry Havelock Ellis
   wrote   
Studies in the Psychology of Sex
Henry James
   wrote   
The Ambassadors
Henry James
   wrote   
Daisy Miller
A novella about a confused courtship that leads to tragedy (1878)
Henry James
   wrote   
Golden Bowl
Henry James
   wrote   
The Portrait of a Lady
Reflects the author's interest in the differences between the New World and the Old (1881)
Henry James
   wrote   
Turn of the Screw
Henry James
   wrote   
What Maisie Knew
Henry James
   wrote   
The Wings of the Dove
1902
Henryk Sienkiewicz
   wrote   
Quo Vadis
Henry Mackenzie
   wrote   
The Man of Feeling
Henry Miller
   wrote   
Big Sur and the Oranges of Hieronymus Bosch
Described the joys and hardships that came from escaping the "air conditioned nightmare" of modern life.
Henry Miller
   wrote   
Sexus
Sexus is the first book of a 3 part series by Miller. The second book is Plexus, followed by Nexus.
Henry Miller
   wrote   
Tropic of Cancer
Led to an obscenity trial that was one of several that tested American laws on pornography in the 1960s. While famous for its frank and often graphic depiction of sex, the book is also widely regarded as an important masterpiece of 20th C literature. Time magazine included the novel in its TIME 100 Best English-language Novels from 1923 to 2005.
Henry Miller
   wrote   
Tropic of Capricorn
A semi-autobiographical novel by Henry Miller, first published in Paris in 1938. The novel was subsequently banned in the United States until a 1961 Justice Department ruling declared that its contents were not obscene. It is a sequel to Miller's 1934 work, the Tropic of Cancer.
Henry Roth
   wrote   
Call It Sleep
Henry Williamson
   wrote   
Tarka the Otter
Hermann Hesse
   wrote   
Beneath the Wheel
Hermann Hesse
   wrote   
Demian
Hermann Hesse
   wrote   
The Glass Bead Game (Magister Ludi)
Last work and "magnum opus" of the German author
Hermann Hesse
   wrote   
The Journey to the East
Short novel features eastern mysticism and a trip through time and space
Hermann Hesse
   wrote   
Narcissus and Goldmund
Story of a young man who wanders aimlessly throughout Medieval Germany
Hermann Hesse
   wrote   
Rosshalde
Hermann Hesse
   wrote   
Siddhartha
Allegorical novel dealing with the spiritual journey of an Indian man during the time of Buddha
Hermann Hesse
   wrote   
Steppenwolf
Herman Melville
   wrote   
Billy Budd
Story of good and evil aboard the HMS Bellipotent in 1797. Unfinished at his death in 1891 and not published until 1924. early versions gave the book's title as Billy Budd, Foretopman, while it now seems clear Melville intended Billy Budd, Sailor: (An Inside Narrative)
Herman Melville
   wrote   
Moby-Dick
"Call me Ishmael"
Herman Wouk
   wrote   
The Caine Mutiny
Pulitizer Prize, 1952
Herman Wouk
   wrote   
War and Remembrance
1978
Herman Wouk
   wrote   
The Winds of War
1971
Herman Wouk
   wrote   
Youngblood Hawke
1961
H. G. Wells
   wrote   
The Invisible Man
H. G. Wells
   wrote   
The Island of Dr. Moreau
H. G. Wells
   wrote   
The Time Machine
H. G. Wells
   wrote   
Tono-Bungay
H. G. Wells
   wrote   
War of the Worlds
Honoré De Balzac
   wrote   
The Black Sheep
Two brothers struggle to recover the family inheritance
Honoré De Balzac
   wrote   
Cousin Bette
1846
Honoré De Balzac
   wrote   
Eugénie Grandet
Honoré De Balzac
   wrote   
Le Père Goriot
1835
Honoré De Balzac
   wrote   
Lost Illusions
Honoré De Balzac
   wrote   
Ursule Mirouet
Horace McCoy
   wrote   
They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?
Horace Walpole
   wrote   
The Castle of Otranto
H. P. Lovecraft
   wrote   
At the Mountains of Madness
H. Rider Haggard
   wrote   
King Solomon’s Mines
H. Rider Haggard
   wrote   
She
Hubert Selby Jr.
   wrote   
Last Exit to Brooklyn
This cult classic takes a harsh look at lower class Brooklyn in the 1950's
Hugo Claus
   wrote   
The Sorrow of Belgium
Hunter S. Thompson
   wrote   
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas
Raoul Duke and his attorney chase the American dream through a drug-induced haze
Iain Banks
   wrote   
The Bridge
Studies the psyche of a car crash victim
Iain Banks
   wrote   
The Business
Kate Telman suspects someone is stealing from the company
Iain Banks
   wrote   
Canal Dreams
A famous Japanese cellist is trapped aboard a supertanker in the Panama Canal
Iain Banks
   wrote   
Complicity
Portrays the Scottish attitude toward sin and transgression
Iain Banks
   wrote   
The Crow Road
It begins, "It was the day my grandmother exploded."
Iain Banks
   wrote   
Dead Air
About the life of Ken Nott, a radio DJ in London
Iain Banks
   wrote   
Espedair Street
A rich and famous rock star struggles to be happy
Iain Banks
   wrote   
A Song of Stone
A story about what happens when normal rules of society break down
Iain Banks
   wrote   
Walking on Glass
Three apparently unrelated stories end with a flavor of incest
Iain Banks
   wrote   
The Wasp Factory
A novel about the abuse of power and religious scepticism
Iain Banks
   wrote   
Whit
A novel about religion and culture
Iain M Banks
   wrote   
Against a Dark Background
An aristocrat is hunted by a religious cult
Iain Sinclair
   wrote   
Dining on Stones
Iain Sinclair
   wrote   
Downriver
Iain Sinclair
   wrote   
London Orbital
Ian Fleming
   wrote   
Casino Royale
Ilsa Evans
   wrote   
Broken
Mother-of-two, Mattie is trying to mend her broken marriage; but her emotional journey leads to an unthinkable conclusion.
Ian MacPherson
   wrote   
Wild Harbour
Ian McEwan
   wrote   
Amsterdam
Ian McEwan
   wrote   
Atonement
Famous quote, "It appeared that her life was going to be lived in one room without a door."
Ian McEwan
   wrote   
Black Dogs
Ian McEwan
   wrote   
The Cement Garden
Ian McEwan
   wrote   
The Child in Time
Ian McEwan
   wrote   
The Comfort of Strangers
Ian McEwan
   wrote   
Enduring Love
Ian McEwan
   wrote   
Saturday
Imre Kertész
   wrote   
Fateless
Iris Murdoch
   wrote   
The Bell
Iris Murdoch
   wrote   
The Black Prince
Iris Murdoch
   wrote   
A Fairly Honourable Defeat
Iris Murdoch
   wrote   
The Good Apprentice
Iris Murdoch
   wrote   
The Green Knight
Iris Murdoch
   wrote   
Henry and Cato
1976; British, 1919-1999
Iris Murdoch
   wrote   
The Nice and the Good
Iris Murdoch
   wrote   
The Sea, The Sea
1978; winner of the Booker prize
Iris Murdoch
   wrote   
A Severed Head
Iris Murdoch
   wrote   
Under the Net
Irvine Welsh
   wrote   
Trainspotting
Isabel Allende
   wrote   
City of the Beasts
2002
Isabel Allende
   wrote   
The House of the Spirits
1982; b. 1942, Chile
Isak Dineson (Karen Blixen)
   wrote   
Out of Africa
Ismail Kadare
   wrote   
Broken April
Ismail Kadare
   wrote   
Spring Flowers, Spring Frost
Italo Calvino
   wrote   
The Baron in the Trees
1957
Italo Calvino
   wrote   
The Castle of Crossed Destinies
Italo Calvino
   wrote   
The Cloven Viscount
1951
Italo Calvino
   wrote   
If On a Winter's Night a Traveler
It's about a reader trying to read a book
Italo Calvino
   wrote   
Invisible Cities
1972
Italo Calvino
   wrote   
Mr. Palomar
1983
Italo Calvino
   wrote   
The Non-Existent Knight
1959
Italo Calvino
   wrote   
Our Ancestors
Italo Calvino
   wrote   
The Path to the Nest of Spiders
Italo Svevo
   wrote   
Zeno’s Conscience
Ivan Goncharov
   wrote   
Oblomovka
Ivo Andrio
   wrote   
The Bridge on the Drina
Ivan Turgenev
   wrote   
Fathers and Sons
Ivan Turgenev
   wrote   
King Lear of the Steppes
Ivan Turgenev
   wrote   
On the Eve


Facts contributed by:


cazza








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