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Cricket - ICC Hall of Fame

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The ICC Cricket Hall of Fame is a Hall of Fame honouring the greatest achievers in the sport of cricket. It was launched by the International Cricket Council on 2 January 2009, in association with the Federation of International Cricketers' Associations, as part of the ICC's centenary celebrations. The initial inductees are the 55 players included in the earlier FICA Hall of Fame, but more will be added each year during the ICC Awards ceremony.
Cricket Hall of Fame

55 facts:

Alec Bedser
   represented   
England
(1946-1955) One of the great fast-medium bowlers, he combined accuracy with in-swing and a lethal leg-cutter. He began his Test career by taking 11 wickets in each of his first 2 Tests against India in 1946 and took 39 wickets at an average of 17.48 in England’s Ashes winning series of 1953. Was also England manager and chairman of selectors.
Alan Knott
   represented   
England
(1967-1981) A wicket-keeper/batsman, he was the first wicket-keeper to take 250 Test dismissals. As a batsman he was a highly effective lower middle-order player, best known for his sweep & cut shots. His best Test score of 135 was against Australia in 1977. In first-class cricket he scored over 18 000 runs with 17 centuries and took over 1 300 dismissals.
Allan Border
   represented   
Australia
(1978-1994) A left-hander, he retired as the leading run-scorer in test cricket. Test records incl. most captaincies (93) and most Tests (156). Was the first batsman to score 150 in both innings of a Test when he made 150* & 153 against Pakistan in 1980, also scored a match double of 98* and 100* against the West Indies in 1984. As a left-arm spinner he took 11-96 against West Indies in 1989.
Andy Roberts
   represented   
West Indies
(1974-1983) A fast bowler who was part of the West Indies fast-bowling attack of the 1970s & 1980s. He had great pace & used the bouncer effectively. He reached 100 wickets in just 19 Tests, taking 32 wickets at an average of 18.28 in his first full series in India in 1974/75. He appeared in all 3 of the West Indies World Cup finals. He made 3 Test fifties in the latter part of his career.
Barry Richards
   represented   
South Africa
(1970) A gifted opening batsman, in his first Test series against Australia in 1970, he scored 2 centuries & averaged 72.57 but South Africa were expelled from international cricket shortly after that. He scored over 28 000 first-class runs incl. 80 centuries at an average of 54. In the 1970/71 season for South Australia he scored 1538 runs at an average of 109.85.
Bill O'Reilly
   represented   
Australia
(1932-1946) One of the great leg-spinners. He bowled his leg-spinners, googlies & top-spinners at an unusually fast pace. He & Clarrie Grimmett were the most successful wrist-spinning pair in cricket history. As a lower-order batsman he hit a fifty in just 31 mins against South Africa in 1936. That 1935/36 series in South Africa was his best, taking 27 wickets at an average of 17.03.
Bishan Bedi
   represented   
India
(1966-1979) A classical left-arm spinner. He used great variations in flight, spin and pace. He captained India in 22 Tests. In 1976 he declared an innings against West Indies in protest against intimidatory bowling. His 266 wickets were a Test record for India when he retired. During the 1975 World Cup he produced 12-8-6-1 against East Africa at Leeds. Also briefly India’s coach.
Brian Statham
   represented   
England
(1951-1965) He bowled straight at good pace & extracted seam movement both ways. 102 of his 252 Test wickets were bowled and 42 lbw. He passed Alec Bedser’s world record of 236 Test wickets. His best Test series was against South Africa in 1960 when he took 27 wickets at an average of 18.18. He took over 2 200 first-class wickets at an average of 16.
Clive Lloyd
   represented   
West Indies
(1966-1985) A middle-order batsman, he was one of West Indies most successful captains, winning 36 & losing just 12 of his record 74 Tests in charge. He also led them in 81 ODIs & to two World Cup titles in 1975 & 1979. In the 1975 final he struck 102 off 85 balls. He made his highest Test score of 242* against India in 1975. He was the first West Indian to appear in 100 Tests.
Clyde Walcott
   represented   
West Indies
(1948-1960) A batsman, he started as a wicket-keeper taking 11 Test stumpings. Later he became a medium-pace bowler & took 11 Test wickets. In 1955 he was the first man to hit 5 centuries in a Test series. He shared one of the highest partnerships in first-class cricket with Frank Worrell when they added 574* for Barbados against Trinidad. He was Chairman of the ICC.
Colin Cowdrey
   represented   
England
(1954-1975) Known for his cover-drive. He was the first player to appear in 100 Tests & passed Wally Hammond to become Test cricket’s leading run-scorer. He also held the record for most catches in Test cricket & captained England in 27 Tests. He became President of the MCC, Chairman of the ICC, was knighted for his services to the game & made a life peer.
David Gower
   represented   
England
(1978-1992) An elegant and entertaining left-hander. In 1985 he led England to a 3-1 Ashes series win over Australia. In that series he scored a career best 215, one of his 2 Test double-centuries. He went on to pass Geoffrey Boycott’s 8 114 runs to become England’s leading run-scorer in Tests. In all, he captained his country in 32 Tests and 24 ODIs.
Denis Compton
   represented   
England
(1937-1957) Particularly famous for his sweep shot & his left-arm wrist-spin bowling. In 1947 he set records for most runs (3 816) & most centuries in a first-class season (18). He scored the fastest triple-century in first-class cricket in just 180 minutes playing for MCC against North-Eastern Transvaal in 1949. He took over 600 first-class wickets. He also played soccer for Arsenal & England.
Dennis Lillee
   represented   
Australia
(1971-1984) A classical fast bowler and was the leading wicket-taker in Test cricket. He reserved his best performances for Ashes series and took 167 Test wickets at an average of 21.00 against England. He was the first bowler to take 100 wickets in ODIs & was most successful in World Series cricket. A tail-ender whose best Test innings was 73* against England in 1975.
Derek Underwood
   represented   
England
(1966-1982) An accurate left-arm spinner, he made an immediate impact in first-class cricket when took 100 wickets in his debut season & became one of the youngest bowlers to take 1 000 first-class wickets. He took 29 Test wickets at an average of 17.55 on the 1976/77 tour of India. He was often used as night-watchman who made his only first-class century in his 591st match.
Don Bradman
   represented   
Australia
(1928-1948) Made 12 Test double-centuries and went over 300 twice. He held the record highest score both for Tests (334) and first-class cricket (452*). His 29 Test centuries stood as the world record for many years, and he is the only man to score 100 first-class centuries without appearing in county cricket. His Test batting average was 99.94. He was dismissed for a duck by Eric Hollies in his final Test innings in 1948 when he needed just four to maintain his career average over 100.
Everton Weekes
   represented   
West Indies
(1948-1958) A wonderful stroke-player all around the wicket. He was the first man to score centuries in 5 consecutive Tests, which he did against England and India between 1948 and 1949. He scored 90 (run out) in his next innings. He achieved the rare feat of scoring five double-centuries in one season on the tour of England in 1950. He was also an excellent fielder anywhere.
Frank Woolley
   represented   
England
(1909-1934) A batsman, left-arm spinner & slip fielder. He got out in the 90s 35 times as well as 145 first-class centuries. He shared a then world record for the 10th wicket in first-class cricket of 235 with Arthur Fielder for Kent in 1909. He is the 2nd highest run-scorer in first-class cricket with nearly 59 000 runs. He took over 2 000 wickets & is the only fielder to take 1 000 first-class catches.
Frank Worrell
   represented   
West Indies
(1948-1963) He was a stylish batsman who played with wonderful timing. He could bowl effective left-arm seam or spin. He made his highest Test score of 261 in 1950. He captained West Indies to 9 wins in 15 Tests as well as the famous tie against Australia in 1960. He twice shared world record partnerships of over 500 for the 4th wicket in first-class cricket.
Fred Trueman
   represented   
England
(1952-1965) A fast bowler, he had a rhythmic action & could produce fearsome pace & lethal late swing. He was the first man to take 300 Test wickets. Amazingly for a genuinely fast bowler, he played over 600 first-class and took over 2 300 wickets. He made 3 first-class centuries. He fielded well at short leg and on the boundary.
Garry Sobers
   represented   
West Indies
(1954-1974) An all-rounder, he set a then Test record of 365* against Pakistan at Kingston in 1958 & went on to become the leading run-scorer in Tests. In 1968 he became the first batsman to hit 6 sixes in an over in first-class cricket. His best all-round series was in 1966 in England with 722 runs at 103.14, 20 wickets at 27.25 and 10 catches. He captained West Indies in 39 Tests.
Geoff Boycott
   represented   
England
(1964-1982) He captained England in four Tests on the 1977/78 tour to Pakistan and New Zealand. He had 151 first-class centuries in all as well as becoming the first player to average over 100 in an English season twice.
George Headley
   represented   
West Indies
(1930-1954) One of the few players to have a batting average over 60 in Test cricket. In his first Test series against England in 1930 he scored 703 runs at an average of 87.87 in 4 matches incl. 4 centuries. His highest Test score of 270* came against England in 1935. In first-class cricket he had a batting average of 69.86 with a best of 344* for Jamaica against Lord Tennyson’s XI in 1932.
Gordon Greenidge
   represented   
West Indies
(1974-1991) A destructive opening batsman. In 1984 he led West Indies to a memorable nine wicket victory smashing 214. In ODIs his average of over 45 is one of the highest in the world. With Desmond Haynes he formed one of the most successful opening pairs. Together they made 16 first wicket century partnerships in Tests and 15 in ODIs, both establishing world records.
Graeme Pollock
   represented   
South Africa
(1963-1970) One of the great left-handed batsmen. He had one of the highest Test batting averages when his Test career was brought to an end at the age of 26 as a result of South Africa’s sporting isolation due to its Apartheid policies. He made South Africa’s then highest Test score of 274 against Australia in 1970 & scored 125 against England in 1965.
Graham Gooch
   represented   
England
(1975-1995) A prolific opening batsman & useful medium-pace bowler, he played for England for 20 years, and captained them in 34 Tests & 50 ODIs. He retired as England’s leading run-scorer in Tests. Against India in 1990 he was the first player to score a triple-century & a century in the same first-class match. His finest Test innings was a score 154* out of 252 against West Indies in 1991.
Greg Chappell
   represented   
Australia
(1970-1984) A right-handed batsman and useful medium-pacer. He passed Don Bradman’s record to become the leading run-scorer in Tests for Australia. He became Australia’s captain in 1975/76 and captained the team in 48 Tests. He was the first man to hold 7 catches in a Test match and on retirement held the world record for most catches by a fielder in Tests with 122.
Hanif Mohammad
   represented   
Pakistan
(1952-1969) In 1958 he batted for over 16 hours, scoring 337, to save a Test against West Indies. This set a record for the longest innings in Test cricket. In 1959 he broke Sir Don Bradman’s record for the highest score in first-class cricket with 499 (run out) for Karachi against Bahawalpur. He was a useful wicket-keeper at first-class level, & could bowl with either arm.
Harold Larwood
   represented   
England
(1926-1933) One of the fastest bowlers of all-time, he was best known for his role in implementing the ‘Bodyline’ approach adopted by England captain Douglas Jardine in an attempt to combat Sir Don Bradman on the 1932/33 tour of Australia. He had his finest Test series on that tour, taking 33 wickets at 19.51.
Ian Botham
   represented   
England
(1976-1992) An all-rounder, highlighted by his legendary performances in the 1981 Ashes series leading to a 3-1 series win. In all, he scored a century and took five wickets in an innings in the same Test on no fewer than five occasions. He was for a while the leading wicket-taker in Test cricket and was also a superb slip fielder.
Ian Chappell
   represented   
Australia
(1964-1980) As a middle-order batsman he was known more for his grit than his elegance and was a particularly good hooker of the ball. He captained the Australian team in 30 Tests between 1971 and 1975. In a Test match against New Zealand at Wellington in 1974 he and his brother Greg both scored two centuries in the match. He was also a fine slip fielder and useful leg-spin bowler.
Imran Khan
   represented   
Pakistan
(1971-1992) An all-rounder, he was the first Pakistani to take 300 Test wickets and the third man overall to complete the double of 3 000 runs & 300 wickets in Tests. In 1982/83 he took 40 wickets at an average of 13.95 in 6 Tests in a high-scoring series against India. He captained Pakistan in 48 Tests and 139 ODIs. He led his team to victory in the 1992 World Cup.
Jack Hobbs
   represented   
England
(1908-1930) In first-class cricket he scored over 61 000 runs & nearly 200 centuries. In 38 innings together with Herbert Sutcliffe he added 15 century partnerships. With Wilfred Rhodes he set a world record first wicket partnership in Tests that lasted 37 years, with 323 against Australia in 1912. Also a useful medium-pace bowler & the leading cover fielder of his day.
Javed Miandad
   represented   
Pakistan
(1975-1996) A middle-order batsman, leg-spin bowler, cover fielder & occasional wicket-keeper. He made 163 on Test debut against N.Z. in 1976 & later in the series scored the first of his 6 Test double-centuries. He was the youngest to score a Test 200 at the age of 19 y. 141 d. At the end of his career he was Pakistan’s leading run-scorer. He captained Pakistan in 34 Tests & 62 ODIs.
Jim Laker
   represented   
England
(1948-1959) An off-spinner, he was most famous for his extraordinary world record match figures of 19-90 (9-37 and 10-53) in the Test against Australia in 1956. Laker and left-arm spinner Tony Lock formed one of the best spin-bowling combinations in English cricket history. In the 1956 series he took 46 wickets at an average of 9.60. In all first-class cricket he took nearly 2 000 wickets. He was also a useful lower-order batsman who scored 2 first-class centuries.
Kapil Dev
   represented   
India
(1978-1994) An all-rounder, he was a leading wicket-taker in Test cricket. His best bowling of 9-83 came against West Indies in 1983, the first captain to take 9 wickets in a Test innings. He once saved the follow-on in a Test match at Lord’s by hitting 4 consecutive sixes. As captain he led India to win the 1983 World Cup. In all, he captained the team in 34 Tests and 74 ODIs
Keith Miller
   represented   
Australia
(1946-1956) An all-rounder, he was a middle-order batsman with a classic high bowling action & could produce genuine pace. He shared a famous and destructive opening bowling partnership with Ray Lindwall. He was also an effective slip fielder. In the Ashes series against England in 1946/47 he scored 384 runs at an average of 76.80 and took 16 wickets at 20.87.
Lance Gibbs
   represented   
West Indies
(1958-1976) An off-spinner who became Test cricket’s leading wicket-taker when he passed Fred Trueman in 1976. He was the first spinner to hold this record. He was extremely economical conceding less than two runs per over in his Test career. His best Test bowling figures were 8-38 against India in 1962.
Len Hutton
   represented   
England
(1937-1955) One of the finest opening batsmen the game has seen. In 1938 he set a world Test record when he made 364 against Australia. In 1952 he captained England and led them to an Ashes triumph in 1953. With Cyril Washbrook he set a then world record of 359 for the first wicket against South Africa in 1948. He captained England in 23 Tests. He was knighted in 1956.
Malcolm Marshall
   represented   
West Indies
(1978-1991) A fast bowler, he had command of pace, bounce, swing & seam. In 1984 in England he took 35 wickets at an average of 12.65 in the Test series, incl. 7-53 when he bowled with his left-arm in plaster. His Test bowling average was 20.94. In 1982 he took 134 wickets in the first-class season at an average of 15.73. As a lower-order batsman, he scored 7 first-class centuries.
Michael Holding
   represented   
West Indies
(1975-1987) One of the great fast bowlers , he was known as ‘Whispering Death’ because of his light-footed run-up. In the Test against England at The Oval in 1976 he took 14-149 in the match, including 8-92 in the first innings. The 14 wickets included 9 bowled and 3 lbws. Although a moderate batsman he did score six Test fifties.
Neil Harvey
   represented   
Australia
(1948-1963) A left-hander who was particularly good at the cut & hook. A superb fielder especially in the covers. He bowled occasional off-spin. In the 1952/53 series against South Africa he scored 834 runs at an average of 92.66 in the five Tests including a career best of 205. He captained Australia once in 1961. He was an Australian selector between 1967 and 1979.
Peter May
   represented   
England
(1951-1961) A batsman, his most remarkable innings was 285* against West Indies in 1957 when he & Colin Cowdrey had a world record partnership of 411. One of England’s most successful captains, he led the team in a then record 41 Tests. His England record of 20 wins as Test captain stood until 2007. He went on to be chairman of England selectors & President of the MCC.
Ray Lindwall
   represented   
Australia
(1946-1960) He bowled with pace, accuracy & effective late out-swing. His best Test series was in England in 1948 when he took 27 wickets at an average of 19.62. He became Australia’s leading Test wicket-taker when he passed Clarrie Grimmett’s record of 216. An all-rounder, he scored two Test centuries. He captained Australia in a Test against India at Bombay in 1956.
Richard Hadlee
   represented   
New Zealand
(1972-1990) New Zealand’s best all-rounder. A fast-medium bowler, he became Test cricket’s leading wicket-taker. His Test wickets came at a rate of more than 5 per Test. Against Australia in 1985 when he took 15-123 in the match including 9-52 in the first innings. He was one of the few men to complete the double of 3 000 runs and 300 wickets in Tests. He was knighted in 1990.
Richie Benaud
   represented   
Australia
(1952-1964) He was a powerful middle-order batsman, skilful leg-spin bowler and fine close fielder as well as being one of the great Test captains. Took 6-70 in the final innings of the Test against England at Manchester in 1961. He was the first player to complete the double of 2 000 runs and 200 wickets in Tests. He was captain in 28 of his Tests.
Rod Marsh
   represented   
Australia
(1970-1984) A wicket-keeper & batsman, he was nick-named ‘Iron Gloves’ after his first Test series in 1970/71 against England as a result of the number of times he dropped the ball. He went on to set the record for most dismissals in Test cricket. With Dennis Lillee he set a record world record combining for 95 Test dismissals. As a batsman he scored 110* against England in 1977.
Rohan Kanhai
   represented   
West Indies
(1957-1975) A flamboyant stroke-maker with a penchant for the unorthodox. His best Test score of 256 came against India in 1958/59. He set a then world record for the 2nd wicket in first-class cricket of 465* with John Jameson for Warwickshire against Gloucestershire in 1974. He captained West Indies 13 times in Tests. He was West Indies coach between 1992 & 1995.
Sunil Gavaskar
   represented   
India
(1971-1987) A great opening batsman, he was the first player to reach 10 000 Test runs and held the world record for most centuries for many years. He was the first player to score 2 centuries in a Test match on 3 separate occasions. He was the first Indian fielder to take 100 Test catches and he captained India in a then record 47 Tests and also 37 ODIs. He was Chairman of the ICC.
Sydney Barnes
   represented   
England
(1901-1914) A bowler who combined swing, seam and spin at medium-fast pace. His 189 Test wickets came at the rate of 7 per Test. He took 49 wickets at an average of 10.93 in 4 Tests on the 1913/14 tour to South Africa, a world record for wickets in a Test series, included a match haul of 17-159 in the 2nd Test at Johannesburg. In all he took 6 229 wickets at an average of 8.33.
Tom Graveney
   represented   
England
(1951-1969) Usually a middle-order batsman, he was also a reliable slip fielder and occasional leg-spin bowler. Against West Indies at Nottingham in 1957 he scored 258, which was his highest Test score. He captained England in one Test against Australia in 1968. He was President of the MCC in 2005.
Viv Richards
   represented   
West Indies
(1974-1991) An outstanding batsman, in 4 tests on the 1976 tour of England he scored 829 runs at an average of 118.42 with 2 double-centuries. He hit test cricket’s fastest century off 56 balls against England in 1986. He was a useful off-spinner & as a fielder affected 3 run outs in the 1975 World Cup final. He captained West Indies in 43 Tests & 108 ODIs. Given a knighthood in 1999.
Wally Hammond
   represented   
England
(1927-1947) A medium-fast bowler & slip fielder. He set a world record for the highest score in Test cricket when he made 336 against N.Z. in 1933, including a then record 10 sixes. In 1928/29 against Australia he averaged 113.12 in 5 Tests. He captained England in 20 of his Tests. He took over 700 first-class wickets. In all first-class cricket he scored over 50 000 runs & took 800 catches
W. G. Grace
   represented   
England
(1880-1899) He compiled the first 2 triple-centuries in first-class cricket & was the first man to score 100 first-class centuries. His Test cricket was limited as he played in an era in which there was little international cricket. He played first-class cricket for 43 years from 1865 to 1908, scoring over 54 000 runs and taking over 2 800 wickets with his round-arm mostly slow medium-pace bowling.
Wilfred Rhodes
   represented   
England
(1899-1930) The only man to appear in over 1 000 first-class matches. An all-rounder & one of the few men to have batted in all 11 positions in the order in Tests. The 1903/04 series in Australia was his most successful with the ball, taking 31 wickets at an average of 15.74. He scored nearly 40 000 first-class runs and is the leading wicket-taker in first-class cricket with over 4 000.


Facts contributed by:


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