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Troilus and Cressida


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Troilus and Cressida
      
"The Common Curse of Mankind - Folly and Ignorance."
William Shakespeare
   wrote   
Troilus and Cressida
Troilus and Cressida
   is a   
Tragic Play
Pandarus
   is a character in   
Troilus and Cressida
Uncle to Cressida
Cressida
   is a character in   
Troilus and Cressida
Daughter to Calchas
Thersites
   is a character in   
Troilus and Cressida
A Deformed and Scurrilous Greek
Ulysses
   is a character in   
Troilus and Cressida
A Greek Prince
Achilles
   is a character in   
Troilus and Cressida
A Greek Prince
Hector
   is a character in   
Troilus and Cressida
Son of Priam, King of Troy
Ajax
   is a character in   
Troilus and Cressida
A Greek Prince. Pronounced "a jakes".
Diomedes
   is a character in   
Troilus and Cressida
A Greek Prince
Agamemnon
   is a character in   
Troilus and Cressida
The Greek General
Aeneas
   is a character in   
Troilus and Cressida
One of the Trojan Commanders
Nestor
   is a character in   
Troilus and Cressida
A Greek Prince
Patroclus
   is a character in   
Troilus and Cressida
A Greek Prince
Paris
   is a character in   
Troilus and Cressida
Son of Priam, King of Troy
Helen
   is a character in   
Troilus and Cressida
Wife to Menelaus
Cassandra
   is a character in   
Troilus and Cressida
Daughter to Priam, a Prophetess
Menelaus
   is a character in   
Troilus and Cressida
Agamemnon's Brother
Alexander
   is a character in   
Troilus and Cressida
Servant to Cressida
Andromache
   is a character in   
Troilus and Cressida
Wife to Hector
Priam
   is a character in   
Troilus and Cressida
King of Troy
Calchas
   is a character in   
Troilus and Cressida
A Trojan Priest, Taking Part With the Greeks
Margarelon
   is a character in   
Troilus and Cressida
A Bastard Son of Priam
Deiphobus
   is a character in   
Troilus and Cressida
Son of Priam, King of Troy
Helenus
   is a character in   
Troilus and Cressida
Son of Priam, King of Troy
Troilus and Cressida
   begins   
"In Troy, There Lies the Scene."
In Troy, there lies the scene. From isles of Greece The princes orgulous, their high blood chafed, Have to the port of Athens sent their ships, Fraught with the ministers and instruments Of cruel war: sixty and nine, that wore Their crownets regal, from the Athenian bay Put forth toward Phrygia; and their vow is made To ransack Troy, within whose strong immures The ravish'd Helen, Menelaus' queen, With wanton Paris sleeps; and that's the quarrel. To Tenedos they come; And the deep-drawing barks do there disgorge Their warlike fraughtage: now on Dardan plains The fresh and yet unbruised Greeks do pitch Their brave pavilions: Priam's six-gated city, Dardan, and Tymbria, Helias, Chetas, Troien, And Antenorides, with massy staples And corresponsive and fulfilling bolts, Sperr up the sons of Troy. Now expectation, tickling skittish spirits, On one and other side, Trojan and Greek, Sets all on hazard: and hither am I come A prologue arm'd, but not in confidence Of author's pen or actor's voice, but suited In like conditions as our argument, To tell you, fair beholders, that our play Leaps o'er the vaunt and firstlings of those broils, Beginning in the middle, starting thence away To what may be digested in a play. Like or find fault; do as your pleasures are: Now good or bad, 'tis but the chance of war.
Troilus and Cressida
   ends   
"Till then I'll Sweat and Seek About for Eases, And at That Time Bequeathe You My Diseases."
A goodly medicine for my aching bones! O world! world! world! thus is the poor agent despised! O traitors and bawds, how earnestly are you set a-work, and how ill requited! why should our endeavour be so loved and the performance so loathed? what verse for it? what instance for it? Let me see: Full merrily the humble-bee doth sing, Till he hath lost his honey and his sting; And being once subdued in armed tail, Sweet honey and sweet notes together fail. Good traders in the flesh, set this in your painted cloths. As many as be here of pander's hall, Your eyes, half out, weep out at Pandar's fall; Or if you cannot weep, yet give some groans, Though not for me, yet for your aching bones. Brethren and sisters of the hold-door trade, Some two months hence my will shall here be made: It should be now, but that my fear is this, Some galled goose of Winchester would hiss: Till then I'll sweat and seek about for eases, And at that time bequeathe you my diseases.
William Walton
   composed   
Troilus and Cressida
1954
Troilus and Cressida
   is a   
Comedic Play
A problem comedy, also a tragedy.
Troilus and Cressida, Titus Andronicus, Timon of Athens
   are all   
Rarely Performed Plays by Shakespeare






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