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Henry IV, Part II


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Henry IV, Part II
      
"He Hath Eaten Me out of House and Home."
Henry IV, Part II
      
"Uneasy Lies the Head That Wears a Crown."
Henry IV, Part II
      
"A Man Can Die but Once."
Henry IV, Part II
      
"I Do Now Remember the Poor Creature, Small Beer."
Henry IV, Part II
      
"We Have Heard the Chimes at Midnight."
Henry IV, Part II
   is a   
Historical Play
Robert Shallow
   is a character in   
Henry IV, Part II
Country Justice
Pistol
   is a character in   
Henry IV, Part II
Edward Poins
   is a character in   
Henry IV, Part II
Lord Chief Justice
   is a character in   
Henry IV, Part II
Bardolph
   is a character in   
Henry IV, Part II
Falstaff
   is a character in   
Henry IV, Part II
Sir John Falstaff
Lord Bardolph
   is a character in   
Henry IV, Part II
Gower
   is a character in   
Henry IV, Part II
Doll Tearsheet
   is a character in   
Henry IV, Part II
Archbishop Scroop
   is a character in   
Henry IV, Part II
Archbishop of York
Silence
   is a character in   
Henry IV, Part II
Country Justice
Francis
   is a character in   
Henry IV, Part II
A Drawer
Lord Mowbray
   is a character in   
Henry IV, Part II
Lady Percy
   is a character in   
Henry IV, Part II
Lord Hastings
   is a character in   
Henry IV, Part II
Davy
   is a character in   
Henry IV, Part II
Servant to Shallow
Blunt
   is a character in   
Henry IV, Part II
Peto
   is a character in   
Henry IV, Part II
Fang
   is a character in   
Henry IV, Part II
A Sheriff's Officer
Francis Feeble
   is a character in   
Henry IV, Part II
Country Soldier
Morton
   is a character in   
Henry IV, Part II
Retainer of Northumberland
Sir John Colville
   is a character in   
Henry IV, Part II
Ralph Mouldy
   is a character in   
Henry IV, Part II
Country Soldier
Peter Bullcalf
   is a character in   
Henry IV, Part II
Country Soldier
Simon Shadow
   is a character in   
Henry IV, Part II
Country Soldier
Snare
   is a character in   
Henry IV, Part II
A Sheriff's Officer
Thomas Wart
   is a character in   
Henry IV, Part II
Country Soldier
Lady Northumberland
   is a character in   
Henry IV, Part II
Harcourt
   is a character in   
Henry IV, Part II
Rumour
   is a character in   
Henry IV, Part II
The Presenter
Travers
   is a character in   
Henry IV, Part II
Retainer of Northumberland
Henry IV, Part II
   begins   
"Open Your Ears"
Open your ears; for which of you will stop The vent of hearing when loud Rumour speaks? I, from the orient to the drooping west, Making the wind my post-horse, still unfold The acts commenced on this ball of earth. Upon my tongues continual slanders ride, The which in every language I pronounce, Stuffing the ears of men with false reports. I speak of peace while covert emnity, Under the smile of safety, wounds the world; And who but Rumour, who but only I, Make fearful musters and prepar'd defence, Whiles the big year, swoln with some other grief, Is thought with child by the stern tyrant war, And no such matter? Rumour is a pipe Blown by surmises, jealousies, conjectures, And of so easy and so plain a stop That the blunt monster with uncounted heads, The still-discordant wav'ring multitude, Can play upon it. But what need I thus My well-known body to anatomize Among my household? Why is Rumour here? I run before King Harry's victory, Who, in a bloody field by Shrewsbury, Hath beaten down young Hotspur and his troops, Quenching the flame of bold rebellion Even with the rebels' blood. But what mean I To speak so true at first? My office is To noise abroad that Harry Monmouth fell Under the wrath of noble Hotspur's sword, And that the King before the Douglas' rage Stoop'd his anointed head as low as death. This have I rumour'd through the peasant towns Between that royal field of Shrewsbury And this worm-eaten hold of ragged stone, Where Hotspur's father, old Northumberland, Lies crafty-sick. The posts come tiring on, And not a man of them brings other news Than they have learnt of me. From Rumour's tongues They bring smooth comforts false, worse than true wrongs.
Henry IV, Part II
   ends   
"My Tongue is Weary; when My Legs Are Too, I Will Bid You Good Night."
One word more, I beseech you. If you be not too much cloy'd with fat meat, our humble author will continue the story, with Sir John in it, and make you merry with fair Katherine of France; where, for anything I know, Falstaff shall die of a sweat, unless already 'a be killed with your hard opinions; for Oldcastle died a martyr and this is not the man. My tongue is weary; when my legs are too, I will bid you good night.






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