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A Christmas Carol


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Charles Dickens
   wrote   
A Christmas Carol
Written as a potboiler to enable Dickens to pay off a debt
Bob Cratchit
   appeared in the Dickens novel   
A Christmas Carol
Longsuffering clerk of Ebenezer Scrooge. Bob endures Scrooge's mistreatment until Scrooge, reformed by the visit of the three spirits, raises Bob's salary and vows to help his struggling family.
Ebenezer Scrooge
   appeared in the Dickens novel   
A Christmas Carol
Probably Dickens' best known character, the miserly Scrooge, with his familiar cry of "Bah, Humbug!", is visited by the ghost of his former partner, Jacob Marley, who sends three more spirits in hopes of reforming Scrooge's heartless and penny-pinching ways.
Belle
   appeared in the Dickens novel   
A Christmas Carol
Scrooge's former fiancee whom he had forgotten until reminded by the Ghost of Christmas Past.
Tiny Tim Cratchit
   appeared in the Dickens novel   
A Christmas Carol
Crippled son of Bob Cratchit. The forecast of Tim's death by the Ghosts of Christmas Present and Future is instrumental in Scrooge's reformation after which Tim is afforded proper medical attention and is cured. Dickens based Tiny Tim (and also Paul Dombey Jr) on his sister Fanny's crippled son Henry Burnett Jr.
Mrs Dilber
   appeared in the Dickens novel   
A Christmas Carol
Scrooge's charwoman who sells his bed linen and curtains to Old Joe when Scrooge is shown shadows of the future by the Ghost of Christmas Future.
Fan
   appeared in the Dickens novel   
A Christmas Carol
Scrooge's sister, mother of his nephew Fred. She has died before the story begins but lives again in the 'shadows' shown to Scrooge by the Ghost of Christmas Past. She is based on Dickens' own sister Fanny who died of consumption at age 38.
Fezziwig
   appeared in the Dickens novel   
A Christmas Carol
Scrooge was apprenticed to 'Old Fezziwig' after he left school. Scrooge visits his old employer with the Ghost of Christmas Past and is reminded of what a kind, generous man he was.
The Ghost of Christmas Future
   appeared in the Dickens novel   
A Christmas Carol
Shows Scrooge the demise of Tiny Tim and of himself, leading to Scrooge's reformation.
The Ghost of Christmas Past
   appeared in the Dickens novel   
A Christmas Carol
Shows Scrooge his lonely and difficult childhood and gradual decline into the miser he will become.
The Ghost of Christmas Present
   appeared in the Dickens novel   
A Christmas Carol
Shows Scrooge the joy that Christmas brings, both at the poor household of the Cratchits and at the home of his nephew Fred.
Old Joe
   appeared in the Dickens novel   
A Christmas Carol
Fence who buys Scrooge's bed linen from Mrs Dilber when Scrooge is shown the future by the Ghost of Christmas Future .
Jacob Marley
   appeared in the Dickens novel   
A Christmas Carol
Scrooge's former partner, who died seven Christmas Eves ago. Jacob, in life, was a penny-pinching miser like Scrooge and is suffering for it in the afterlife. His ghost comes to haunt Scrooge hoping to change Scrooge's life and therefore avoid Marley's fate.
Brian Desmond-Hurst
   directed   
A Christmas Carol (1951)
Born in Ireland, directed many films including His And Hers, Behind the Mask, Dangerous Exile, Simba and The Malta Story
Charles Dickens
   wrote   
A Christmas Carol
Published 1843
Belle
   appears in the Dickens' novel   
A Christmas Carol
Scrooge's former fiancee whom he had forgotten until reminded by the Ghost of Christmas Past.
Bob Cratchit
   appears in the Dickens' novel   
A Christmas Carol
Longsuffering clerk of Ebenezer Scrooge. Bob endures Scrooge's mistreatment until Scrooge, reformed by the visit of the three spirits, raises Bob's salary and vows to help his struggling family.
Ebenezer Scrooge
   appears in the Dickens' novel   
A Christmas Carol
Probably Dickens' best known character, the miserly Scrooge, with his familiar cry of "Bah, Humbug!", is visited by the ghost of his former partner, Jacob Marley, who sends three more spirits in hopes of reforming Scrooge's heartless and penny-pinching ways.
Fezziwig
   appears in the Dickens' novel   
A Christmas Carol
Scrooge was apprenticed to 'Old Fezziwig' after he left school. Scrooge visits his old employer with the Ghost of Christmas Past and is reminded of what a kind, generous man he was.
The Ghost of Christmas Future
   appears in the Dickens' novel   
A Christmas Carol
Shows Scrooge the demise of Tiny Tim and of himself, leading to Scrooge's reformation.
The Ghost of Christmas Past
   appears in the Dickens' novel   
A Christmas Carol
Shows Scrooge his lonely and difficult childhood and gradual decline into the miser he will become.
The Ghost of Christmas Present
   appears in the Dickens' novel   
A Christmas Carol
Shows Scrooge the joy that Christmas brings, both at the poor household of the Cratchits and at the home of his nephew Fred.
Jacob Marley
   appears in the Dickens' novel   
A Christmas Carol
Scrooge's former partner, who died seven Christmas Eves ago. Jacob, in life, was a penny-pinching miser like Scrooge and is suffering for it in the afterlife. His ghost comes to haunt Scrooge hoping to change Scrooge's life and therefore avoid Marley's fate.
Old Joe
   appears in the Dickens' novel   
A Christmas Carol
Fence who buys Scrooge's bed linen from Mrs Dilber when Scrooge is shown the future by the Ghost of Christmas Future .
Tiny Tim Cratchit
   appears in the Dickens' novel   
A Christmas Carol
Crippled son of Bob Cratchit. The forecast of Tim's death by the Ghosts of Christmas Present and Future is instrumental in Scrooge's reformation after which Tim is afforded proper medical attention and is cured. Dickens based Tiny Tim (and also Paul Dombey Jr) on his sister Fanny's crippled son Henry Burnett Jr.






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